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Fashion Special Africa’s Top 10 Male Fashion designers


Kofi Ansah


“His unique use of quilting, embroidery and appliqués has become a signature mark that makes his creations stand


out amongst many.”


His collections have graced runways from Europe to the US and across Africa. His creations can be found in retail shops on both sides of the Atlantic, from South Africa to Ghana, the US (Saks Fifth Avenue) and UK. Ansah believes he inherited his creative talents from his


parents. His father, a traditional chief from Senya Breku, Ghana Central Region, is a classical musician and photographer and encouraged him to pursue his interest in art and design. His brother, Kwao Ansah, is a filmmaker and has twice been a winner at the FESPACO Film Festival. Ansah returned home to Ghana in 1992, after spending 20


School of Art, London, with honours in Fashion Design and Design Technology. His apprenticeship in the fashion industry found him working in established houses such as Guy Laroche in Paris and Cecil Gee in London. Renowned for his innovative and elegant deigns, Ansah is


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the founder of Artdress, a design and creative company through which he runs his labels, Kofi Ansah Couture and Kofi Ansah Design Collection. An award-winning designer, his accolades include the African Fashion Awards 2000 and the prestigious Ghana Quality Awards Diamond Division for clothing and textile with Artdress, 2003. Ansah designed the anniversary fabric for the Ghana @ 50 Golden Jubilee Celebrations and in 2008 he designed costumes for the opening and closing ceremonies at the African Cup of Nations, held in Ghana. In 2009, he was the chief designer at the Festival of African Fashion and Arts. His unique use of quilting, embroidery and appliqués has become a signature mark that makes his creations stand out amongst many.


ith his distinct eye for detail and individuality, Kofi Ansah has earned himself a reputation as an avant-garde designer, highly revered in his native Ghana and among fashion connoisseurs worldwide. Ansah is a graduate of the Chelsea


years in Europe. He said he went back home to contribute to the development of the Ghanaian clothing industry. While his return to Ghana has inspired him to blend richly textured and bold colour prints of his homeland into his designs, he is equally committed to seeing the Ghanaian textile and fashion landscape grow in economic prominence. He serves as the fashion consultant to the Ghana Textile Printing Company (GTP). His input has helped steer GTP to becoming one of the leading textile companies in the country since 1995, with its unusual wax prints widely sold in Ghanaian and West African markets. Ansah is also the clothing industry expert of the PSI Round Table on clothing and textiles. A major player on the African fashion scene, he is the founder


and former president of the Federation of African Designers. Through Artdress, he trains local designers with potential to reach international standards. For the future, Ansah says he wants to re-enter the US and European markets on a bigger scale. Watch out!


“While his return inspired him to blend richly textured and bold colour prints of his homeland into his designs, he is equally committed to seeing the Ghanaian textile and fashion economic landscape grow.”


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Belinda Otas


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