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Corica Golf Complex in Alameda. There are others. These are hard times for


the common golfer. There are stories about


Lost Links designed by famous architects, like the Lido course in New York, but these stories focus on the loss of masterpieces, historical treasures. This story is more about what is really lost when a golf course folds, the loss of a community, a culture, a family.


But this is also a story


about how some communi- ties came up with ingenious, creative solutions to keep their courses alive and open. One such course is in


the small hamlet of Twain Harte, where the citizens saw how Sierra Pines and


Mi Wuk folded nearby. But this town was not about to let that happen to its nine-hole, par-3 course when mon- ey became a prob- lem. The popula- tion, about 3,000, came together and volunteered


its time to get the course back on its feet. There was no payroll—volunteers took green fees, cut the grass, did all the jobs necessary to keep the course alive. After all, these same


people created the baseball diamond that borders the golf course through vol-


unteer efforts, so why not the golf course? And in three years time, in 2009, the figures went from red to black. Today the course is alive and well, a true family course. That was a


creative solution.


Here’s another. The Chuck Corica Golf


Complex in Alameda once boasted nearly 300,000 rounds a year on its two 18- hole championship courses and the Mif Albright 9-hole course. But play fell drastically on this munici- pal complex after the 9/11


crisis. City council talked about eliminating the Mif course, where the juniors and seniors played. Former NCGA Junior champion James Hahn, now play- ing the Nationwide Tour, talked about the plight of the course he grew up on in a national press conference last year.


The Alameda Junior Golf Club came to the rescue. They proposed to city council that the Mif be absorbed into its non-profit organization. The council weighed this surprising op- tion when the Wadsworth Foundation (a trustee of The First Tee) stepped for- ward and offered $250,000


Francis H. I‘i Brown South Course •


You’re warming to the idea, aren’t you?


From natural wonders to


uncommon luxuries, discover more of what you come to Hawai‘i for. Visit us at bigisland.org.


BIVB-17365 R1_4.625x5 v2.indd 1 BIVB-17365 R1_4.625x5 1/3 Page Square, 4c pub: NCGA Golf – April/May/June 2011 – Hawaii Editorial


SPRING 2011 / NCGA.ORG / 41 4-5/8” x 5”


3/7/11 11:46:40 AM


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