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Heading into its 21st season, Hempfest is a gathering of growers, vendors and musi- cians in Redway. Last November’s Hemp- fest featured Lukas Nelson, Willie’s pro- marijuana-farmer kid.


707 Cannabis College in Garberville of- fers one-day classes and weekend seminars on growing, legal issues and cooking with marijuana: www.707cannabiscollege.com


The Mateel Center in Redway offers a variety of great concerts and festivals: www.mateel.org


The Humboldt tourism bureau maintains a calendar of other events—from bird- watching to beer-drinking—at www.red- woods.info


Getting There Driving: Arcata is five hours north of San Francisco on Highway 101. From Sacra- mento, take Interstate 80 to Highway 39 in Vallejo to Highway 101. From Redding, take Highway 299 West to Highway 101. For a spectacular windy road favored by black-market marijuana couriers speeding to Los Angeles, Highway 36 meets Inter- state 5 near Red Bluff and meets Highway 101 about 50 miles south of Arcata.


Flying: United and Horizon airlines serve Arcata/Eureka Airport, which has a repu- tation for being slower and less reliable than a stoner.


Where to Stay The first time I stayed at Hotel Arcata in the pre-Prop. 215 1980s, I brought my bong and puffed out a window overlook- ing The Plaza. Most recently, and now a card-carrying medical marijuana user, I asked the desk clerk if it’s OK to smoke a bong in the historic hotel. “Just don’t have a party in the hallway and we won’t bust down your door,” was all he said. The Hotel Arcata is much more friendly than The Benbow Inn near Garberville, which assesses $500 fines for “any smoking” in its rooms. Better still, if you check into Hotel Arcata (rooms starting around $80) bring your own vaporizer: www.hotelarcata.com


Camping is easy in Humboldt: The Coun- ty operates three nearby campgrounds. Clam Beach features beach and RV


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Luke’s Joint, also on Arcata Plaza, sourc- es locally and serves playfully, breakfast through dinner. Pork Butt & Jelly isn’t a sandwich, but an open-faced mound of pulled barbecue bathed in fruit compote. Ancho-chili corn waffles are eye-openers. They have Veggie and meaty sandwiches and wraps, too.


camping and is northern Humboldt’s sea- sonal hub for itinerant trimmers; Samoa Dunes offers RV and tent camping, a boat launch and showers on Humboldt Bay; and Big Lagoon offers waterfront camp- ing, boat launch and showers. Patrick’s Point State Park is a good choice, too.


Where to Eat Brio, on Arcata Plaza, is the place for cof- fee and pastry – and to see and be seen, inside or outside.


Naan of the Above (867 7th St., Arcata; naanoftheabove.com) tweaks taco trucks, serving Indian food from a turmeric-col- ored trailer and tent.


The Arcata Farmers Market happens Saturdays on The Plaza.


Arcata Scoop (1068 I St., look for the wooden ice cream cone) makes organic ice cream from Marin County’s Strauss Fam- ily cream and local ingredients, such as the lavender-honey from Willow Creek that sublimely saturates the Scoop’s vanilla.


Samoa Cookhouse started serving loggers all they could eat in 1893 and continues


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