This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Shilshole Bay Yacht Club Snowbird #1 Someone once told me that when the


temperature approaches the windspeed you should not be out sailing, which in theory sounds like some really sound logic. Yet Snowbird Series race #1 in Seattle, Washington proved that theory wrong when a large contingent of hearty PNW sailors headed out into winds of 30 to 35 knots out of the North, with sunny skies and wind chill that easily brought the temperature down into the mid to low thirties. Shilshole Bay Yacht Club puts


on its annual Snowbird Series races throughout the winter, one race per month from November to March in the beautiful and varying waters off the Shilshole Bay Marina, near Seattle. 19 boats in three classes made it out for the first race in the blustery cold conditions, 8 boats that were entered decided not to start in the tough conditions, of the 19 boats that did start 8 boats where scored DNF. As the boats entered their starts with single and double reefed mains,


#3‘s and staysails, they pushed across the line into building waves and breeze for the 11 mile course up around the Spring Beach buoy, down to West Point and back to the finish. With not much current running on


FORGET THE WEATHER


We’ve got your boat project covered. Seaview Fairhaven


the tide, it was amazing to see how big the waves were getting just from the long fetch from Whidbey Island down to Shilshole. One boat didn‘t reef down and used a full main (flogging at times) and #3 and easily motored away from the fleet to weather, reeling in the J-130 Skededel that owed them 69 seconds per mile on correction. But that full main to leeward had the J-105 USAWI smoking it downwind in the 30 to 35 knots of breeze, easily staying on the transom of the much bigger and faster J-130 that held its reefs in, as most of the fleet behind them chose to do as well. Behind them, the first major carnage of the day took place when the little Pocket Rocket made it around the weather mark in fine form, hoisted their spinnaker and poof, it sets and off it goes, the spin that is, not the boat. They tried, but it didn‘t hold and they were reduced to main and jib like the rest of the fleet. Nobody else elected to try a spinnaker. Class one, the non-flying Sails class


(which was really everyone on this day), was dominated by Joe Bozick‘s Breeze who beat the second place boat, Frog Prints. These where the only two boats, of the four that started class one that finished the race. Class two, the largest class of the


Seaview West Seaview East SEAVIEW SPECIALS:


FREE HAULOUT WITH BOTTOM PAINT PACKAGE 10% OFF LABOR RATE


Offers end February 15th. For details see our website or call the yard nearest you. SEAVIEW EAST


On the Ship Canal in Ballard 206-789-3030


east@seaviewboatyard.com


SEAVIEW WEST At Shilshole Bay Marina 206-783-6550


west@seaviewboatyard.com www.seaviewboatyard.com 48° NORTH, JANUARY 2011 PAGE 88


SEAVIEW NORTH At Squalicum Harbor Marina 360-676-8282


north@seaviewboatyard.com


SEAVIEW YACHT SERVICE FAIRHAVEN


In the Historic Fairhaven District 360-594-4314


fairhaven@seaviewboatyard.com


day, with eight starters, had a much tighter finish with Paul Walchenbach‘s Mata Hari correcting only two minutes in front of Paul Kalina‘s Perfectly Strange for first place. Third place was taken by David Field‘s Quorum correcting 11 minutes off the pace on this tough, cold, windy day. Class three, with seven starters, was


given a clinic by Robert Blaylock‘s J-105 corrected eight minutes in front of Ken Chin‘s Olson 911 Kowloon and almost 10 minutes in front of Irvine Alpert‘s J-130 Skededel. But even with their dominating performance, USAWI was part of the largest group to finish the blustery race with six of the seven starters finishing in class 3 rounding out the class was Sling Shot, Beltane & Izakiah respectively.


by Ben Braden


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114