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Sew Your Own Lifeline Cushions


By Bev Parslow With short, winter days, we continue to work on our boat Silver Shadow, but


at home. One of the things we love to do is to sew and we have been able to fabricate winch, tiller, sail covers and other items, including an African Queen style canopy. With a simple sewing machine you are able to produce items that are of a high quality but, at the same time, saving a great deal of money. There is also the pride that you get having made the item yourself, plus the ability to fix it if anything goes wrong. One of the simplest projects is a cushion for your life lines. It takes about two hours and uses a minimal amount of Sunbrella™. Other material can be used but I have been very happy with this material.


1. You will need the following items; a sewing machine, yardstick, chalk for marking, Sunbrella™, solder gun to cut/melt the material, a noodle, clear plastic hose that fits the noodle, string and a cloth tape measure.


3. To cut the Sunbrella™ you will need a solder gun. I have measured the length and the width that is needed. Using a yardstick, I will mark the line with chalk and then cut the cloth with the heat produced by the gun.


2. You need to measure the noodle. Measure the length and then the circumference. To the circumference you need to add an inch for the seam that will needed later. For the length you need to add an extra 1½ inches to form the end. That means an inch and a half at each end.


48° NORTH, JANUARY 2011 PAGE 74


4. The cloth is then folded lengthways. You need to sew a seam all the way along the length of the cover. The seam is about one 1/8 of an inch from the outside of the material.


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