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Galley Essentials with Amanda


The Larsen Family: Eric, Christine, Finn, Sophie and Freya aboard “Jenny P”


Soon after arriving


Samoa we were thrilled by the surprise arrival of Jenny; a smart Hans Christian 33 sailed by Eric and Christine Larsen and their children, Sophie (10), Finn (7), and Freya (5). They’d departed Seattle at the beginning of summer stopping only in San Francisco then Hilo before arriving in Samoa. As Eric, then Christine, had completed expeditions last year aboard Mahina Tiare, I was eager to hear of their new adventures. In receiving the following galley advice from not only Eric and Christine but also the kids I realized that Eric and Christine might be in need of a quiet dinner ashore so I offered to baby sit for an evening.


Christine: Our goal is to sail to


Australia. We’ve been on an accelerated trip so now that we’ve arrived in the South Pacific I’m looking forward to slowing down. It took a lot longer to get the boat upgraded than we’d planned and we only really started getting the boat together in January. Eric left work in April and we left Seattle May 9th for San Francisco. It was cold sailing down the coast. We’d stocked up with six grain breakfast biscuits; they come in a tube and keep a long time in the fridge. We’d bake them for breakfast and it was nice to have the boat warm. Precooked bacon was a hit as was hot eight grain cereal. I’d grate an apple into it, serving it with a dollop of yogurt and nuts just like John does on MT.


Sophie: Upon reaching the equator


it was too hot for cooked breakfasts, we’ve lately been having cold cereal. We like Special K and Cheerios and UHT milk is good. We made tortilla chips by toasting a flour tortilla then cutting 48° NORTH, JANUARY 2011 PAGE 58


The Galley of “Jenny P”


by Amanda Swan Neal


it into squares. I then thought…. What if we put on marinara red sauce and cheese before toasting them? We turned them into mini pizzas. Yumm.


Finn: I like Top Ramen, but we


don’t get it very often. Mum and Dad are always saying they don’t want to eat it all up, so we only eat two packs at a time.


Sophie and Finn: Yeah, we caught


four fish, but a mahi escaped. It was resisting our rum. We kept spraying rum in its gills, but it still didn’t work, and it somehow jumped off the gaff. It was fighting like this “poww, baang, crusssh” (Finn goes into full fish flapping action to match his sound effects) It was fleeing all around so Dad said “Let’s knock it out.” He used the fish billy for the first time and that got messy.


Freya: I don’t eat fish. Mum and dad


had fish steaks and ceviche, they said it was good.


Sophie: Sadly, no, I don’t get to cook. I help out though. I made lemonade. It was


hot crossing the ITCZ it rained a few times, we really welcomed it. We didn’t have a lot of fruit, so we took lemons and limes and squeezed them into a juice. We’d bought dad a lemon squeezer for his birthday. You chill water, then mix it with the juice and a little sugar. It’s really good. We eat meals together, though at breakfast either Mum


or Dad are sleeping because they do watches. They sleep pretty good, we can be noisy.


Christine: Leaving Hawaii we


carried as much fresh fruit as we thought would last and used dried fruit when we started to run low on fresh. Dried mangos are everyone’s favorite along with dried cherries and blueberries. For an extra boost we did instant breakfast mix with either UHT or powdered milk. For lunches and dinners we do a lot of quesadillas, pizzas, black beans, jarred red tomato sauce or make our own and serve it with spaghetti noodles.


Eric: We allocated spaces to different


food types: a corner cabinet for snacks, a deep counter box for plastic food storage containers and under the main salon seats (four lockers with hatches) for long term provisions. Unfortunately the salon seat back and cushions are each one large piece so it’s awkward and frustrating the move the entire cushion to access to a locker. We try and keep things organized such as having the milk and juice on top in the fridge so it’s just a quick opening of the lid. Once in a while we have to dig something out, so then everything has to come out. Our spices are under a companionway step, when you lift the step up you can easily see all their lids.


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