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Some of that food was still with us when we left Mexico for the Marquesas in 2010. Except for a few scenarios, sustaining yourself locally works fine and is part of the cultural experience. In addition to the obvious long term provisioning for places where you can’t acquire food, dietary issues, high costs, and unattainable favorites are rational reasons to stock up. Otherwise, beans to Mexico are like coals to Newcastle. Don’t forget the fun stuff. After


you’ve found your way to new anchorages, what do you do once the hook is down? Watching the ships roll in is boring where there are no ships. As sailors like water, beach, and other outdoor activities, don’t forget to put some thought into the gear. Snorkeling gear, kayak, windsurfer, speargun, lightweight hiking boots, fishing gear, bocce ball set, kites, SCUBA gear, or whatever you envision. There is more to cruising than boat chores. Also, as we found out, snorkeling gear that we collected at yard sales and the three dollar fish fillet knife became a hassle when actually using them. Some of these items are attainable in far off places, but with limited selection or


Behan & Jamie in the Marquesas- relaxing after the 3,000 mile passage from Mexico.


high prices. If you wear prescription glasses, prescription lenses for a mask are inexpensive and completely change any underwater experience. The littlest breakages can be a big


pain in the asymmetric. In the 2010 Pacific crossing, there was no shortage of big breakages: seized engines, broken masts, broken rudders, sinkings and so on. The majority of boats experienced the occasional issue with sails, auto- pilots, watermakers, line chafe, etc. But truly amazing is the number of little bits onboard, which seem insignificant, until they break. Dodger zippers. Gear


bag zippers. Clothing zippers. Zippers seem to achieve a kind of petrified state unless used often or lubricated with Teflon (PTFE) gel. Snaps seize up. Springs, such as the removable handle in our “all stainless steel” marine grade cooking set, crumble. UV resistant thread keeping the dodger together suffered fatal UV damage in less than two years in the tropics. New long life batteries fade out in half of the rated time. Computer USB ports rust in months. Blocks with ball bearings in them grind with dried salt, producing excessive friction. The upside of these endless niggling little issues is that they provide the cruiser with job security. Being cleared into Australia,


employed with to-do lists and patiently waiting for fun activities, I take pride in being a cruiser and developing our own style. We prepared for disasters, but let go of the obsession with it. Let go of the sharks of cruising preparation, but don’t forget about those little stinging jellyfish. “Totem” has crossed the Coral Sea


from New Caledonia to Australia. Follow the Giffords and other cruising blogs at www.48north.com


Offshore Performance Liveaboard Comfort


"The Outbound is, in brief, a fabulous boat. She's fast,well balanced and the details are right. She's a terrific boat for going to sea.." Bill Biwenga, 4 time Round The World race veteran after an Outbound Trans Atlantic delivery


Call for private Lake Union showing of our newest 46 and special Pre-Show pricing.


www.OutboundYachts.com 949-275-2665


48° NORTH, JANUARY 2011 PAGE 39


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