This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
and made yet another seemingly minor decision that would, in fact, completely alter all future sailing trips—we planned a trip to the “Big Water.” the sea. July saw our young family


heading north and west to the waters of the Pacific Northwest. From that moment on we were hooked, no longer would our home waters suffice, the salt water would forever be in the blood, the Sirens had called, we had answered. Port Townsend would be our


base as we tentatively made out first baby steps on the ocean blue. Besides day sails that year, we also explored the area by car. We had our first ferry ride as we crossed over to Seattle and what did our kids remember most, the ferry, no, the beautiful Seattle skyline, no, not even the Space Needle. What they remember most were the breakfast sandwiches aboard the ferry. Well you make memories as you can I guess. This decision to pick Port


Townsend as our first base to explore the region would lead us back many, many times, over the next two decades, to this unique old-world sailing port. It was here at the docks a fellow sailor remarked, as two adults and four kids emerged from our now tiny 21-foot boat, “ Just how many do you have in there?” He was right, the family was physically getting larger, it was time to start the search for our next Fantasy. While our 21-foot MacGregor was


fine for our home waters, we wanted to, again, expand our horizons in the waters of Puget Sound and the San Juans. We would need a bigger boat, but just what? She still had to be trailerable, which put a limit on size but we also wanted standing head room, a


desires. In 1997 we were down to just our two youngest daughters. It all passes so fast—one second our youngest is standing on the aft deck steering Fantasy into Anacortes, the next she is a medic with the 10th Mountain in the sands of Afghanistan and later Iraq. We now made yet another fateful


decision, and I’ll tell you it was one of the hardest decisions of my life, we swallowed the anchor and sold our boat. Seeking new adventures, now in the air, we left the sea, still not knowing if the decision to include the kids in all our sailing adventures had been the right decision. “Time” was still not ready to devulge the answer. Years passed and a longing stirred


GO NOW! Put off the bigger boat, use what you have, and use it now. The time you spend together, as a family, when your kids are young, will be the best times of your life.


nice galley and an enclosed head. All this we found in our beloved 26-foot Kent Ranger. Thus, 1989 saw us heading to the


“Islands” for the first time. The Ranger opened up new horizons as, over the next decade, we explored the inland waters—from Olympia in the south, to Desolation Sound in Canada, our family sailed and explored. We felt strongly that these summer


cruises include all the family. Was this right decision, only time would tell, but not for many more years. These years, looking back, went


by quickly, too quickly. Our children were growing up. Each an individual, each with their own dreams, their own


deep, deep down. The Sirens call, heard all those years ago, once again had to be answered. So, like those pesky little Lemmings, we returned to the sea. The fall of 2003 saw us on Lake Union purchasing a 31-foot Bombay Clipper, a new Fantasy. With a now empty nest, it was just


Teresa and I as we set sail in the spring of 2004 for a five month cruise. We had hoped that this cruise, fantasized many years before, would allow us to once and for all get the sea out of our blood. We now realize, some six years later, that can’t happen and, further more, we do not want it to happen. You see that five month cruise was, just possibly, the best five months we have ever had together. Memories piled on memories were made that summer, yet upon our return home, we still wondered just how many memories had our children retained of our past sails when they were growing up. We did get a few hints that those


Puget Sound’s Most Experienced Sail Loft • Serving Pacific Northwest Cruising Sailors Since 1959 •


6010 SEAVIEW AVE. NW. ✰ SEATTLE, WA 98107 ✰


Blending proven traditional handwork and modern sailmaking techniques to ensure good performance and lasting durability.


New sails manufactured on site - Inshore, Coastal, Offshore & Traditional Constructions - Sail repairs and recuts Furling conversions - UV covers and foam luffs - Sail covers and other canvas. Sail cleaning by Clean Sails.


Phone 206-783-2400 www.schattauersails.com 48° NORTH, JANUARY 2011 PAGE 62


info@schattauersails.com FAX 206-783-0173


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114