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FOCUS


Healthcare premises


Factory Production Control audits, and an ISO 9001 quality management system.


System description


PPS systems are generally self contained and consist of the following: • an electric pump or pressurised water supply


• a water reservoir or tank containing a ten minute supply (around 120 litres)


• connecting pipework and strainer • 72 hour battery backup • an open watermist nozzle A PPS needs to detect and suppress a fire at a very early stage before significant heat and smoke has developed and caused serious injury. In practice, this means that system actuation is typically by dedicated smoke detection, as more traditional thermally activated devices may be too slow, especially for smouldering fires in clothing or bedding. On detecting a fire, the PPS activates, with


a minimum watermist delivery duration of ten minutes. Additional safety features include the ability for the unit to provide a remote alarm signal in the event of actuation, so that the


emergency services can be alerted. PPSs are designed to be quickly and easily deployed in the home of a vulnerable person, potentially within a short time of the risk being identified. Generally, the systems can be delivered to


site, filled with water from a tap, plugged into the mains and be providing protection within a few hours. They are aesthetically designed to blend into a domestic environment and be reasonably unobtrusive, to assist with the acceptability of the units within the home environment (see Figure 3 below).


Fire and function tests


An experimental programme was used to trial a range of fuel packages, ignition mechanisms and determine pass/fail criteria for benchmarking the systems. Two fire test protocols were chosen to represent the range of hazard scenarios. The first is ignition by a tea light placed on top of the fuel package, to simulate a fire starting in bedding or nightwear. In this test, the fuel package is located at the margin of the PPS discharge spray pattern. The second test has a more energetic ignition


package consisting of 100ml of heptane and a wood crib positioned beneath the fuel package,


Figure 3: Example of a PPS unit deployed, note the dedicated fire detection arrangement.


34 FEBRUARY 2019 www.frmjournal.com


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