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BRIDGE


KONGSBERG MARITIME Kongsberg Maritime is a global technology company providing ‘Full Picture’ technology solutions for yachts. Headquartered in Norway, Kongsberg Maritime has manufacturing, sales and service facilities in 34 countries. Kongsberg Maritime solutions includes marine automation, safety, manoeuvring, navigation, and dynamic positioning as well as energy management, deck handling and propulsion systems, and ship design services. For expedition yachts, sophisticated forward looking or omni-directional sonars are available for obstacle avoidance, bottom detection and navigation. KONGSBERG supplies high-technology products, systems and solutions to the oil and gas industry, the offshore and merchant marine, and the defence and aerospace industries. For more details Tel: +47 32 28 5000 or visit www.km.kongsberg.com


said, “Once the captain gets to know it, I think this is the dynamic positioning system. I know many are ‘afraid’ of it, think it is complicated to use and unnecessary, but I’ve heard so many stories from captains that have taken their time to learn it, telling how it saved a situation. Now we are trying to simplify the operation, by integrating it with the navigation system and having it operated through the chart display, hopefully giving the captains more trust in it. This is a part of what we call advanced manoeuvring.”


Marcel Vermeulen said, “Of course each situation calls for its own favourite tool, but we’ve noticed a large amount of positive feedback on the ease of operation which Joystick and Dynamic Positioning offer. The automated assistance in berthing and other complex manoeuvring situations is highly appreciated.”


Almost inevitably Team Italia’s Massimo Minnella cites his own equipment. And why not? He says, “From our experience the captain treasures most our multicontrol system that allows them to use the majority of the systems on board with the same Human Machine Interface.” He adds, “Our exclusive I-Bridge system makes possible the integration and control of the different systems that are now essential on board, from a single piece of equipment, using the latest touchscreen technologies.”


Chris Warde thinks GPS is top of the captains’ most treasured list. He says, “Whether they’re using an ECS/ECIDS or even paper charts, being able to immediately plot your position saves a lot of time and effort.” Sticking to the same theme of time saving kit, Gianluca Babini at Simrad opts for Radar. He says, ”It is not only very good at monitoring situations automatically but it does so at the same time as reducing the workload for all of those working on the bridge.”


TRAINING


As bridge equipment has become more complex, has the maintenance become more difficult we asked our panel of experts: “Are users now better trained in the use and maintenance of the equipment than in the past?”


Barry Murfin at Charity & Taylor believes, “Maintenance has been lessened with the manufacturers developing more versatile and common hardware platforms, along with ‘maintenance free’ hardware. Training


for ETOs and Engineers direct from manufacturers has helped bridge the gap for preventative maintenance tasks.”


“Bridge equipment has become more complex having a lot of functionalities.” So says our man at Simrad Gianluca Babini. He adds, “We are in charge of simplifying the user experience of the bridge, it’s mandatory. The maintenance is not more difficult, usually it works or not! The crew are very different but I would say that younger crew adapt to new systems more easily.”


Chris Warde thinks, “Users are definitely not better trained, equipment and management solutions have become more intuitive and have therefore become easier to maintain.”


Giving us the Kongsberg point of view Roger Trinterud says, “This very much depends on the actual configuratio n. How many brands of equipment, how integrated they are, and whether the owner/captain has given an ETO or other crewmember the possibility to do some training. With a good, trained ETO and remote diagnostic functions, we actually see less need for travelling, but increased phone/web support.”


With the shift to a more automation focus of bridge equipment, information and communications technology (ICT) maintenance aspects obviously grow, and remain a concern as with all new adopted technology. However, the growing expertise of remote access and support is putting these fears at bay. For professionalism and safety these bridge systems are vital.


92 | SPRING / SUMMER 2020 | ONBOARD


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