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food & drink


What's new in food and drink. The latest trends for you to try over the coming months


THE INGREDIENT... IBERIAN HAM


Where is it from? The oak forests of western Spain in the regions of Extremadura and Andalusia. It is made from the front and rear legs of Iberico/Pata Negra (black foot) pigs. Top of the four grades in quality is bellota ham which comes from free range pigs that roam the forest eating acorns.


The taste: Cured up to four years, the best bellota hams have an intense, almost fudgy flavour and fat that melts like butter on the tongue.


Use it: It's far too good to cook with, so serve it as a snack, at room temperature. It goes brilliantly with salted almonds and pickled peppers, with a glass of fizz or crisp fino sherry. Team with a rustic bread, lightly salted butter and a hefty handful of rocket.


TREND TO TRY


ORANGE WINE


What is it? A wine made from white grapes in which the pressed grape juice is kept in lengthy contact with the skins during and after fermentation. The result is a wine with a deep orange colour. Flavour wise it tends to have less acidity than white, but with some some of the tannin and bitter edge of a red. It has been made for millennia, notably in Georgia but has recently gained popularity elsewhere in Europe. Drink it with: Charcuterie, cheese and roast meat. The wine is a good match for food from the Middle East & TheBalkans.


FREE SPIRITS


If you're looking for an alcohol free spirit for a cocktail, look out for these


.


STRYYK While many


alcohol-free spirits are based on clear counterparts, Stryyk has managed to make a rum. So if you're in need of a Daiquiri before 5pm.... this is your rum of choice, or maybe not...


SEEDLIP


It’s arguably Seedlip that started the alcohol-free spirit movement having emerged in 2015. Spice 94 was the first edition and is our favourite of the three on offer from this distillery.


BORRAGO


This is one of the most complex


flavours that you will find in the alcohol- free market. Borrago is named after the Mediterranean purple flower, borage, that features on the fruity label of this bottle.


IT'S A THING...CARROT TARTARE Big with the fast pack right now


carrot tartare plays with your senses, surprising and delighting you. On


first glance, you might mistake this dish for beef tartare; the ground red carrots closely resemble raw ground beef. The presentation is visually striking. It’s beauty on a plate.


COOK'S TIP KEEP ROLLING


Is your pastry turning greasy and tough in warm weather? Try putting butter in the freezer for 30 minutes before using. Grate the hard butter into the flour then mix.


DON'T THROW IT


COOKED RICE


Leftover rice is a great base for a quick meal, but it needs to be cooled and refrigerated quickly after cooking to prevent the development of harmful bacteria:


Spread out the cooked rice on a baking sheet and cool quickly to room temperature


Transfer to a resealable container and chill in the fridge. Use within 24 hours


Reheat in a pan on the hob (or in a microwave). Add a splash of water and a knob of butter or drizzle of oil. Cover with a lid and heat gently stirring occasionally until steaming hot. Don't reheat more than once


ONBOARD | SPRING / SUMMER 2020 | 67


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