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superyacht community has quickly embraced the concept making it a commercial success, but on the commercial shipping side growth of this sector has been somewhat slower. With PAYS yacht crew have access to the world (with the exception of 5 areas) and only get charged for the cells they sail through. So a yacht can be sat at anchor of the coast of France and start planning route across the other side of the world. They save time and money by being able to keep entire areas up to date, without having to purchase the individual cells.”


There is a tracking fee and planning fee for PAYS, but the cost the yachts save on the ENC consumption far outweighs this up-front subscription. In shipping however, where their ENC consumption is already kept to a bare minimum, the perceived benefits of having more access to ENC data is not deemed a high enough value for the additional tracking and planning fees. Warde says, “Interestingly we see a more widespread adoption of full


paperless


navigation in the commercial shipping sector. You would expect with all the perceived money in yachting, that superyachts would be leading the way with technology. It’s true that as individual vessels, the new larger superyachts tend to have the most advanced technology and equipment, pushing the boundaries of integration, but there is also a large fleet of smaller (sub 500gst) yachts and older yachts that don’t have the technical infrastructure to run paperless and therefore continue to run with paper as the primary source of navigation. While paper navigation is quickly becoming something of the past in shipping, there is still a sector of yachting that continues to use paper and this is unlikely to change in the near future.”


COMMERCIAL SHIP VS SUPERYACHT Probably the biggest difference between ships and yachts can also be drawn within yachting itself as the difference between privately registered yachts and commercially registered yachts. As a commercial


ADMAREL For committed sea travellers who want to feel at home on the sea Admarel’s aim is to be their trusted advisor; a centre of excellence for advanced marine electronics. Working with leading naval and interior architects and some of the world’s top yards, they design, specify and integrate bespoke and state-of-the- art AV, IT, security, lighting, navigation, communications and integrated bridge systems for superyachts. New builds or refits, the skilled and experienced engineers deliver advanced, fit for purpose systems that are effective, proven and flexible. Admarel also offer worldwide service packages that provide 24/7 maintenance, repairs and updates both remotely and on-site. For more details Tel: +31 (0)78 692 19 00 or visit www.admarel.nl


vessel you are more exposed to Port State inspections and have much tighter regulatory restrictions from flag meaning, in theory, you have no choice but to carry the required material, be completely up to date and have comprehensive passage planning detailed and recorded. Privately registered yachts are recommended to carry the same as a commercial vessel, but are not required to do so.


ONBOARD | SPRING / SUMMER 2020 | 85


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