search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ADVERTORIAL


Cyber security threats


Are you ready for the IMO legislation surrounding cyber security for yachts? Ian Petts of Equiom Monaco discusses the necessary planning and training steps required


adopted a resolution to ensure that cyber risks are appropriately addressed in maritime safety management systems. This resolution significantly impacts the world’s superyachts and penetrates down through the yachting support industry.


T


Deadline looming For yachts, any risks must be addressed no later than the first annual verification of the owning company’s document of compliance after 1 January 2021, which leaves little time to undertake an assurance test and implement any recommendations. The guidance from the IMO is compulsory for commercially registered yachts over 500 tonnes and optional for others. Smaller yachts may, however, be required to implement and address the guidance by their insurance company.


What is a cyber security assurance test? The IMO cyber security assurance testing will typically include a threat assessment, vulnerability scan and a penetration test both from within and externally to the yacht as well as an audit of systems, policies and procedures. A detailed customised remediation plan with a roadmap costings and timing plan will then be implemented prioritising the highest risk areas.


Complexity of yacht IT systems Today’s yachts are equipped with myriad smart, technical, entertainment systems and networks. There are several entry points for hackers on a yacht, not to mention the


he Maritime Safety Committee of the United Nations IMO (International Maritime


Organisation), recently


indirect threat via the systems of yacht management firms, the family office and supplier networks.


Indeed the often quoted Maersk cyber- attack in the shipping industry which infected 49,000 PCs, laptops and printers, was caused from hackers entering through the accounting system; a successful hack which cost Maersk ten days of lost operation and caused losses of $250-300 million.


The guidance from the IMO is compulsory for commercially registered yachts over 500 tonnes and optional for other smaller yachts


On today’s yacht, security cameras, jacuzzi lights, navigation systems, stabilisation systems, engine management systems and anchor systems are all computer controlled and therefore at risk. It is even possible for GPS systems to be altered to cause collisions with other vessels.


Billionaires often run a family office from their yacht, with sensitive transactions, business decisions and portfolios managed on board. This is even more prevalent currently with the Covid-19 virus outbreak leading to wealthy individuals self-isolating on their yacht, perhaps without considering the cyber security implications. But this lack of planning and security could make an easy target for hackers.


Importance of culture and training towards threats


It is not only the hardware and software which are important, it is building awareness and understanding of the possibility of a cyber attack among crew, yacht suppliers, the management company, the family office and anyone else involved with the yacht.


Yacht crew are very familiar with fire drills, but how many yacht and management companies have prepared for cyber attacks and regularly practice drills?


Personnel need to be trained on how to spot common cyber threats and prevent accidentally introducing a cyber risk. Anticipation is key, as well as understanding that an attack impacting the yacht is more a case of ‘when’, not ‘if’.


Aside from a yacht’s technology, personal devices and peripherals such as tablets, laptops and smart phones owned by crew guests, suppliers and visitors are all common malware infection points and are not always addressed in implemented policies and procedures.


Plan ahead and plan now A cybersecurity audit is recommended, not only to meet the IMO deadline, but also to give owners, managers, captains, the family offices and charter yacht guests confidence against attacks from hostile media, opportunist hackers and organised crime.


For more details Tel: IanPetts@equiomgroup.com or visit www.equiomgroup.com/cybersecurity


ONBOARD | SPRING / SUMMER 2020 | 17


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120