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PORT OF PLENTY


Toulon Bay’s port authority, manages eight ports in the region of Toulon accompanied by many specialist services companies


ADVERTORIAL


he port of Toulon is blessed with an exceptional geographical position. Toulon Bay, one of the most beautiful in Europe, is naturally protected from winds and is only a stone’s throw from some of the most important yachting destinations in the world such as Saint- Tropez, Antibes, Cannes and Monaco.


T


As a commercial port, most berths are ISPS certified and French navy presence ensures maximal protection of the harbour. Close at hand for the business airports of Le Castellet and Golfe de Saint-Tropez, the port of Toulon is also accessible from the international airports of Toulon-Hyères and Nice Côte d’Azur, or from Toulon TGV train station which has direct links for Paris and Roissy/ Charles-de-Gaulle. Toulon has over 300 shops accessible on foot within a few minutes, museums, an opera house, theatres, cinemas and a Provençal market which are of great interest as a potential destination for the yachting community.


Toulon Bay is well known as an essential call for exceptional sailing conditions and deep-water berths with access for even the biggest yachts (up to 300m LOA). With 1.5 km of quayside available for superyacht berthing, the world’s most prestigious yachts stop regularly for technical, supply or bunkering calls. They are attracted by ISPS conformity,


round the clock security, and a network of shipyards and service companies.


No less than five yards are based in Toulon. They offer an array of know-how, lifting capacities and complementary specialist services to deliver the widest variety of services.


The Métropole Toulon Provence Méditerranée, Toulon Bay’s port authority, manages 8 ports in the region of Toulon and accompanies these shipyards’ implantation and development by land reclamation and offering berthing space when the yards are full. Quaysides in the South of the bay have been renovated in 2019 and projects for 2020 include the launch of a full refurbishment of an extra 400m of berthing for superyachts. These projects are all driven in an ecologically responsible framework.


Sailors who are looking for natural


beauty when they’re relaxing away from their ship will be spoilt for choice in the Métropole and the surrounding area. Within a few minutes of the port and city are the Toulon mountains: Faron, Mont-Caume and Coudon. These are a haven for walking, mountain biking, trail running and climbing activities in unspoilt surroundings. The region is also teaming with other activities for sports enthusiasts: rugby, golf courses, track


cycling, and even the famous Paul Ricard F1 circuit is just 22 km away.


The Port Authority’s Commercial


Development and Management department was launched in June 2014 to act as an entry point for superyachts to act as a link between the Authority, port services, and present and future port users. This department has multiple roles:


• Optimisation of port service quality


• Optimisation of relationships with port users and concessions per sector in the port of Toulon


• Optimisation of port installations, berth occupation and services with the Harbour Master


• Commercialisation of the sectors in Toulon port under direct management


• Assistance with accounting matters for port services


• Implementation of management rules as fixed by the Port Authority,


• Reduction of the ports’ environmental footprint.


This department is available for any questions you may have concerning the running of the port of Toulon.


For more details Tel: +33 (0)4 83 24 30 60 or email: toulon@metropoletpm.fr


ONBOARD | SPRING / SUMMER 2020 | 53


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