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Park Profile www.parkworld-online.com


Bu Hu lbu t’s Cas tle Park toda Park in Riverside, California, which was opened in 1976 byWendell “Bud”


from his ubiquitous contr Hurlbut's Castle Park


MARC MARCH 20 201 9


n 1960 Bud designed and built the Calico Mine Ride, considered at that time to be the most elaborate and innovative dark ride in the business, and in 1966 he collaborated with Karl Bacon and the Arrow Development Company for the world's first log flume ride, which opened at Six Flags Over Texas, followed by the famously elaborate version at Knotts Berry Farm in 1969 which, along with the Calico Mine Ride, operated as his own concessions within Knotts Berry Farm. was a final “settling down” ibutions to the amusement


I


Bud Hurlbut’s Castle Par k toda y To examine how a successful kiddie park operates, ParkWorld visited Castle


Hurlbut, a legend in the amusement industry; an earlier park he had opened in El Monte, California in 1945, was frequented byWalt Disney and the two became friends.


industry. It has grown since its founding 43 years ago. ParkWorld recently talked with KenWithers, general manager of Castle Park .


PW: Castle Park s ar ed out as a kiddieland, as they were called in the 1950s, although it has certainly grown beyond that. What is the proper name for kiddieland? KW: I am not sure if there is a new ‘proper name,’ but we like to call ourselves a regional amusement park.


PW: Castle Park started out as a kiddieland, as they were called in he 1950s, although it has cer ainl wn beyo


ond that.What is the


proper name for kiddieland? KW


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