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EU Bytes


Former Executive Director of the European Casino Association and current Managing Director of Time & Place Consulting, Glenn Cezanne provides the latest info on what’s trending and what’s coming down the pipeline in Brussels and around the EU.


W Glenn Cezanne 28 DECEMBER 2019


e are finally there. Habemus Commission has, at the time of writing this article, already taken office. Exciting times are ahead. Now that a new Commission is finally


taking the reins, we will be seeing the institution’s work programme become more concrete, initiatives which will affect the gambling sector start being…well, initiated. So, while we wait, I thought for this edition it would be worthwhile to give you an idea of what has happened to get us where we are. And, of course, not to be missed, a bit on what is expected from a macro- political perspective, and the impact of Brexit.


The battle of Brussels


On 27 November, MEPs gathered in Strasbourg to give their final approval to the von der Leyen’s Commission, allowing outgoing Commission President Juncker to officially leave the HQ one


month later than originally planned. After being sidelined in July by the EU Council’s decision to reject the Spitzenkandidat process, the EU Parliament brought its game in the October’s hearing of the Commissioners-designate, thoroughly vetting all candidates put forward by von der Leyen. You might remember that Romania’s and Hungary’s nominations were the first to fail the MEP’s pre-hearing check for conflict of interests. Well also Macron’s first choice, former MEP Sylvie Goulard, was rejected after two parliamentary hearings and written Q&As. Further complications due to Romania’s government collapse and UK’s refusal to nominate a Commissioner despite the Brexit extension to 31 January made for an interesting Autumn in Brussels. After 14 November, the three new Commissioners-designate were approved and the College as a whole faced the final vote in Strasbourg.


Tobias Arhelger/Adobe Stock


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