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STATESIDE


Wynn and his insurance carriers will also pay


Wynn Resorts $41 million to settle shareholder lawsuits that charged company directors with failing to disclose Wynn’s alleged pattern of sexual misconduct.


The official NGCB complaint stated: “His conduct demonstrated that he is not a person of good character, honesty, and/or integrity. His conduct further established that he poses a threat to the public interest of the State of Nevada.” It claimed Wynn “damaged the public’s confidence and trust in an industry that is vitally important to the economy of the State of Nevada and the general welfare of its inhabitants.” Wynn has filed a complaint against the NGCB’s ability to


revoke his license since he left the company. He labels any fines as an exorbitant “exit tax.” A 19th December NGCG hearing may determine the outcome. The NGCB was reacting to the Massachusetts Gaming Commission’s (MGC) scathing report from last April. The MCG charged Wynn Resorts’ executives with fostering a culture of fear while ignoring company policies/procedures and years of sexual misconduct allegations against Wynn. Executives and board members argued that Wynn Resorts


has reinvented itself and no longer centers around a single man. New leadership includes three women as directors, updated policies and a continued commitment to transparency with regulators. In late April, the MGC also imposed a $35 million fine for


Wynn Resorts to retain its gaming license and open the $2.6 billion Encore Boston Harbor in Everett. I disagree with the NGCB’s complaint and side with


 


Massachusetts. Individual actions and behavior should determine that person’s rise or fall. Executives come and go, so who knows who did what back then? The employees pay the price and the public will hardly reject gaming over one person. Wynn revolutionized Las Vegas and Atlantic City gaming over 35 years and his operational and architectural influence


  


remains. At 77, the disgraced Wynn is wealthy enough to never feel any real financial impact. As a longtime trial lawyer, Norman advocated that people


have their proverbial “day in court.” If someone is not actually proven guilty, should accusations be enough for punishment? Maybe it depends on what it is, but no one is sure. A year


after my proposed 2018 harassment story*, I still cannot get anyone to talk to me. Companies, Congress and religious institutions regularly


settle with accusers to silence them or avoid bad public relations resulting from any false charges. They sometimes are and this trade-off is considered “the cost of doing business.” Stay long enough at a job and you’ll probably see both. Countless people have cost their organizations millions, but remained employed. Others, considered too visible and toxic, were fired. These are often impossible topics to resolve with certainty. As I have since I began this column in 2001, I wish you


and your families a happy holiday season. May 2020 only bring good things. Thanks for reading all these years.


* Editor Jon Bruford proposed a story or stories about sexual harassment and how it was handled within the industry.


DECEMBER 2019 11


Stevecuk/Adobe Stock


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