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IndustryNews


Klein Tools donates tools for Salvation Army project K


lein Tools has provided tools for the Salvation Army in Greece, to help the charity upgrade


its Athens support centre, which helps thousands of people seeking asylum in the city. There are some 60,000 refugees in Greece, with thousands more arriving daily from Iran, Afghanistan and Syria. The Salvation Army in Athens works alongside other charitable organisations to protect asylum seekers from human traffickers, providing aid to needy families. The charity’s bases is a 1930s’ mansion that had been


empty for years. However, the lack of electrical connections make it challenging for the charity to operate in, especially during the winter. A local jobless electrician volunteered to work for free but had no tools, so Klein Tools was approached for help.


Captain Jean-Curtis Plante, Regional Business and Administration Officer for Salvation Army Greece/Italy


said: “We approached Klein Tools to see if they could supply a few items that would help us with the support centre refurbishment project. We were absolutely delighted when they said they could help and now we have the tools to complete the project.” Malcolm Duncan, Managing Director of Klein Tools‘


distributor Super Rod said: “When we were approached by Jean-Curtis about the project, we were really keen to help. He needed some fundamental hand tools, like pliers, cable cutters and wire strippers, as well as some test meters, so we put together a package of items and shipped them over. “The great thing about Klein Tools is that they are


built to last, so not only does the Salvation Army have what it needs to complete the rewire on the Athens centre in the here and now, but it also has a tool resource which can be used for future projects in Greece and Italy for many years to come.”


Inventor of blue LED lights wins at IET Achievement Awards 2017 T


he Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) has named the


winners of its 2017 Achievement Awards. And one of the most significant awards, the Mountbatten Medal, went to Nobel Prize winner Professor Shuji Nakamura for his pioneering work to develop blue LEDs and lasers. The awards recognise individuals around


the world who have made exceptional contributions to the advancement of engineering, technology and science in any sector. Professor Nakamura used novel InGaN growth


processes to enable the commercialisation of blue LEDs as high efficiency, low power light sources, to which he holds the patent. He was also the first to demonstrate group III nitride based high brightness blue/green LEDs and violet laser diodes. His LED inventions have been used for multiple applications, including TV and mobile phone screens, due to their lower energy consumption, and enabled the development of the Blu-ray DVD. Nick Winser, IET President, said: “Professor


Nakamura’s inventions have resulted in highly successful commercial LEDs, that not only save considerable energy consumption, but have revolutionised new technology such as the Blu-ray disk. It is our pleasure to recognise him as our Mountbatten Medal winner for his outstanding contribution to technological innovation.” Professor Nakamura, said: “It is my great honour to receive the Mountbatten Medal.


www.ewnews.co.uk


Salvation Army electrician, Ali, with Captain Jean-Curtis Plante.


Philips Lighting OEM wins at Lux Awards 2017


P


Nobel Prize winner Professor Shuji Nakamura, who was presented with the IET’s Mountbatten Medal for his pioneering work developing blue LEDs and lasers.


Since the invention of the blue LED in 1993, many researchers joined the field and created many applications for solid state lighting such as mobile phone screens, LED TV, and large displays. But the application with the greatest impact to the world’s energy consumption is that of general illumination, recognising that one quarter of all the world’s electricity is used for lighting.


“LED Light bulbs are more than ten times efficient than incandescent bulb, and they last for 50 years!” For more information about the awards, visit:


www.theiet.org/achievement


hilips Lighting has announced one win and one highly commended at the Lux


Awards 2017 for their OEM business – Philips Lighting OEM UK. The Lux Awards are a recognised annual


event designed to celebrate both creativity and sustainability in lighting. Presented in front of 800 senior lighting


professionals at a gala event at the O2 InterContinental, Philips Lighting’s YellowDot Technology won Connected Lighting Innovation of the Year Award. As the only open program that exists for lighting-based indoor positioning, judges commended Philips Lighting’s YellowDot Technology for ‘bringing the power of GPS to indoor retail applications’. Philips Lighting’s Xitanium SR Driver also came highly commended in the Enabling Technology of the Year category, which highlights exceptional development in sources, drivers, optics, thermal products and innovative materials. Philips Xitanium SR LED drivers simplify the


integration of sensors and controllers into luminaires because they do much more than provide power conversion for LED lighting.


January 2018 electrical wholesaler | 5


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