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IndustryNews


Hitachi Power Tools still going strong with caving exploration team


expedition team intent on exploring exciting new underground systems in Spain, the tools are still going strong – despite operating in the most arduous of environments. “The Hitachi cordless 18V SDS Hammer Drill has been in almost constant use both abroad and in the UK since then and has been a real asset to our club,” said cave explorer, Chris Jones. “Through the use of this drill we have explored


F


great extensions beyond the 1987 limit in Cueva del Agua and increased the depth of Ogof Ffynnon


our years aſter Hitachi originally provided its power tools to a caving


Ddu in Wales to over 300m – the deepest in the UK.” Only with a drill are cavers able to safely climb


upwards, placing bolts into the featureless walls as they go. The quality of the drill is of significant importance here, as many bolts are placed at full arm’s length. A heavy or inefficient drill is often the cause of failing to reach the top. “I’m really pleased the team has found our


cordless tools so long lasting, powerful, tough and reliable,” said Simon Miller, Marketing Director for Hitachi Power Tools. “We will be supporting the cavers with more technology and power tools in 2018.”


Substantial investment sees move to new premises H


ughes Trade is celebrating aſter completing a major investment in its


Leicester operation, enabling it to further increase the range of services offered to customers throughout the Midlands and beyond. It has moved into new 6,500sq ft premises on


Meridian Park, close to Junction 21 of the M1, from where 16 members of staff operate. The new branch will also be home to Hughes


Trade’s commercial arm with much greater space for spare parts and repairs plus central training facilities. It also allows the opening of a specialist trade counter to provide businesses with an unrivalled choice of electrical goods at highly competitive prices. The commercial side mainly serves the care, hospitality, tourism and educational sectors by supplying, installing, servicing and repairing a


Left to right: some of the Hughes team at the new Leicester base – Jamie Deering, Luke Flanders, Karl Jelley, Steve Hunter and Matt Amey.


range of highly specialist washing machines and dryers together with glass and dish washers from the Miele Professional and Hobart ranges. It also supplies other commercial products including refrigeration equipment and vacuum cleaners from German manufacturer Sebo. Said Hughes Trade General Manager, Paul


Scolmore Group company, Unicrimp, debuts at ELEX


A


ttracting electrical contractors from across the UK, the ELEX shows are the ideal


platform to showcase the latest products and technologies that are shaping the future of the electrical industry. Having benefited from the dedicated audience at these events over many years, Scolmore welcomed Unicrimp to ELEX in Manchester last month (March), for the first time as part of the Scolmore Group participation.


Launched in 2014, Unicrimp offers a


comprehensive range of cable accessory products that complement Scolmore’s current wiring accessories and lighting portfolios. The range is marketed under the Q-Crimp brand name.


8 | electrical wholesaler April 2018


Chisnall: “We have been operating in Leicester for a year now and always knew that to grow we needed much larger premises than we previously had in Boston Road. So, we are delighted to have been able to move the branch to such a great location; one that not only has enabled us to open a trade counter but also gives us space for further expansion. “The last 12 months have been very successful and we have become accredited by the Eastern Shires Purchasing Organisation (ESPO) which has led to significant new business from the public sector. “We are also seeing a big growth in our


rental business because it offers so many advantages such as managing cash flow and taking the worry out of anything going wrong, while for many businesses it is 100 per cent tax deductible.”


Devondale Electrical says it is committed to developing its supply of high quality renewables products to meet growing demand in the region.


The expansion is being


overseen by the company’s renewables specialist, Max Harvey (pictured), who joined the business last year. Max said: “I like the long-term vision in


renewables, especially with society understanding it needs to become more sustainable. “With a wider, more effective range of renewable electrical products becoming


Max greens up for Devondale S


outh West independent electrical wholesaler


available, it’s a good time to move into the area in greater depth.” Max, 26, became interested in


renewable products during a graduate scheme with a national electrical wholesaler, which resulted in his appointment as Green Technology Manager. He moved to Devondale last August and after a


stint in general electrical sales, he was given the remit of masterminding the company’s renewable offer. Initially based at the Glastonbury branch,


Max has been busy working closely with Devondale’s senior management team over the past six months, setting up supply chains and researching new suppliers, such as JA Solar, SolaX, K2 Systems and Solar Edge.


www.ewnews.co.uk


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