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MACHINE SAFETY SUPPLEMENT FEATURE


IP69K emergency stop buttons and safety relays from elobau


elobau is promoting its range of IP69K emergency stop push buttons and associated safety relays


with contact failure indication should the contact block become detached from the head. When connected to one of its 463 series safety relays, a PLd/SIL2 system is assured. The relays are available in a single or dual input format, and are suitable for 24VDC operation. These space saving relays are slim and compact in design, and efficiently combine guard door and emergency stop monitoring in one device, making it a cost effective solution. They have one sensor input and two potentially free relay safety outputs. Up to eight sensors can also be connected via an elobau input expansion unit. The relays also have an LED display for simple diagnosis. Visit


http://www.elobau.com/Machine_safety/Reliable_ condition_detection/E-stop_buttons_&_contact and


http://www.elobau.com/Machine_safety/Safety_c ontrol_units_/_Safety_relays for further information. If you would like any more information about


T


his robust range of emergency stop buttons has been designed and built to operate in


difficult environments. Two versions of the IP69K e-stops are available to suit any application. The compact NHT01D has been designed for non- hygienic applications and is ideal for use in operating panels. The NHT02D has a hygienic boot, and has been designed especially for use in food zones and hygienic areas. Both versions of these estops have an operating range of -30°C to +70°C, and meet all applicable standards. Particularly suitable for food processing, pharmaceutical and cosmetic machine building OEM’s, this emergency stop button range is a high quality product, designed and built to conform to all the latest standards applicable to these devices. elobau’s range of emergency stop buttons also


includes push button heads with other features such as key switch operation, switch position displays, illuminated blocking, anti-obstruction protective collars, and an operation protection collar designed to prevent unintended operation. To complete elobau’s emergency stop button range, there are also a number of corresponding contact block configurations. Additional features that are available in this range include a version


elobau’s emergency stop button range or any other products in elobau’s machine safety, level measurement or sensor portfolio, please contact elobau UK.


Guardian Guardian Th The


Emer enc -s op button


Emergency-stop bu tons


Justinc et llays. Danger


are Kemer catio t in case there remely ei is no


he elobau emer en e


nc reliable ot time ef for d rde-


ays. Danger i is i immes immediately stopped. The elobau emergency-stop buttons are extremely reliable and robust. IP69K emergency-stop buttons have been designed to co ms


ediately stopped. nc -stop bu ons and robus


en designed to conform to t e late norms, and are suitable for hygienic appliications. In an emergency a singlency a single action prevents or limits damage. Be- yond doubt our bouncer does his job. his job.


op bu ons have m to the latest


and are sui able f r hygienic . In an emer limi


en damage. B nd d ubt our b uncer d


elobau UK T: 0161 974 3250 www.elobau.com


/AUTOMATION


uk-s


 +44 (0) 61 9 -sales@elo


www.elobau.com


4 (0)1619 4 3259743250 es@eloba eloba


obau.com


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