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DRIVES, CONTROLS & MOTORS FEATURE What do your motors really do?


In 1969, the first home security system was born, consisting of four peepholes and a camera that could be moved to look through any of them, broadcasting the images to a monitor. Nowadays, we can now stream and view a feed of our home security cameras on our mobiles, giving homeowners greater piece of mind. Here, Markus Brettschneider, of ABB’s food and beverage programme, explains how food plant managers can add a similar level of connectivity to retrofit most motors with smart sensors to bring their plants into the digital age


I


ndustry as a whole is utilising technologies and solutions enabled through the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Gartner predicts that 25 billion devices will be connected to the internet of things by 2020*, with some agencies predicting even double this amount. This presents plant managers with a conundrum. Most food manufacturing and processing plants currently have motors powering essential equipment such as mixers, conveyors and packaging machines. These are just motors and do not play in the same league as the other intelligent devices in their factories. With years of service often left in the


motors, it’s difficult for plant managers to justify replacing motors that work effectively for the sake of an upgrade with any smart features. However, there are alternatives to a complete overhaul in order to connect motors to the IIoT. Instead of investing in new, more intelligent or smart equipment, plant managers can now invest in sensors that provide similar functionality to connected devices. For example, ABB offers smart sensors, which can be fitted to almost any standard low voltage induction motor. The pocket-sized sensor, dubbed ABB Ability Smart Sensor, is directly attached in a couple minutes to the motor’s frame, without wiring. By using sensors that feed performance data to the cloud through a smartphone or gateway solution to a secure server, plant managers can bring their motors up to date with the IIoT. This data gives plant managers a full picture, even on mobile devices, of how their motors are


working, without having to carry out dangerous hands-on monitoring. Plant managers can then carry out condition- based or predictive maintenance, rather than periodic maintenance. Using the right method to monitor


motor condition, enables plant managers to reduce unplanned downtime by up to 70 per cent. This is particularly important in the food and beverage industry, where even a short downtime can be extremely costly. Infrastructure failures in this industry cost up to $75,000 per hour and have a serious impact on seasonally produced items such as sugar. This is a cost that plant managers can avoid by using the right performance insight and awareness. An increased awareness of the


condition of any motor also leads to a


better awareness of how an entire system is performing. For example, a motor overheating or burning out may indicate a problem elsewhere in the production line, such as a line moving too fast and producing waste. Eliminating this problem could improve energy efficiency by up to ten per cent. Motors, the heart of the food and beverage plant, don’t have to be left behind in the age of the IIoT. Just like a home security camera being connected to your mobile phone, a smart sensor could give a motor a new lease of life, making it perform as an integral part of the data- rich factory and providing all the additional benefits that this creates.


*www.gartner.com/news room/id/2970017


A ABB T: 01925 741547 new.abb.com/food-beverage STANDARD HMIS USED TO RECONFIGURE SAFETY CONTROL FUNCTIONS


BB has developed a method of using standard human machine interface (HMI) products such as control panels, industrial PCs and


mobile devices to reconfigure safety control functions. Using ABB’s AC500-S safety programmable logic controller (PLC), operators of equipment such as harbour and factory cranes, hoists, elevators, airport passenger bridges, automatic guided vehicles (AGVs), robots, mining and pulp & paper machinery can select, modify and amend their safety control functions. This allows them to achieve high functional safety standard requirements while benefiting from the convenience and low costs of using standard HMIs. Standard HMIs that support at least two different Ethernet-based communication protocols can be used. ABB recommends Modbus/TCP and ABB ETH. A mean time between failures (MTBF) greater than 22.5 years is required for standard HMIs to satisfy PL d (ISO 13849-1) requirements. HMIs with lower MTBFs may only satisfy PL c (ISO 13849-1) requirements. Benefits of using standard HMIs include cost savings on safety I/O channels and mode selector switches.


f i d d


The ability to select from a wide range of HMI products offers the user independence from any one vendor, a larger range of input options and greater flexibility to adapt the connections and layout of the HMIs. The method allows connecting to high and low level safety systems remotely. For more details, visit new.abb.com/safety


/AUTOMATION AUTOMATION | JUNE 2017 29


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