search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FEAT RE FEA ATURE CA


DRIVES CONTR LS & MNTROLS & MOTORS S, C, CABLE COLOUR CODING – UNDERSTANDING DESINA


CABLE COLOUR CODING – UNDERSTANDING DESINA D


ESINA stands for DistributEd Standard sed INstAllation T chechnollogy and is ais a


ESINA stands for DistributEd Standardiised INstAllatio


o


standardisation for components used on chines,


industrial machines, including the drives, control systems and cabling. It’s a great idea with many benefits, but, w ere it relates to cable colour coding, the situation may be a little confusing and there's roomfor error.


standardisation for components used on ndustrial


systems and cabling. It’s a great idea w th m ny benefits, but, where it relates to cable colour coding, the situation may be a little confusing and there's room for error. Andrew Fallows,


Andrew Fal ows, m naging director of M tor Technology, explains...


Technology, explains.


The D SINA standard w s created by mem ers of the German Machine Tool Builders’ Association (VDW) in conjunction with key automotive manufacturers and suppliers. The obj


ers’ conjunction with key


automotive m nufacturers and suppl ers. The objectives were to reduce the variety of


bjectives w re to reduce the variety of


components, simplify design and avoid errors in assembly, but ambiguity w en i comes to cabl colour coding has recently led to som confusion.


For example, one cable m nufacturer, i attempt to comply with DESINA, recently changed the colour of its cable for feedback on servo systems fromorange to green. Although the new green cable w s i entical, in terms of its specificatio s, to the p evio


For example, one cable manufacturer, in an attempt to comply w th


an SIN , recently


changed the colour of i s cable for feedback on servo systems from orange to green. Although the new green cable was identical, in terms of its specifications, to the previous orange one, it demonstrates how misinterpretation is not uncom on with DESINA colour coding. In reality the cable m nufacturer w sn’t entirely wrong in the first place. A cording to


orange one, it


demonstrates how msinterpretation i not uncommon with DESINA colour coding. In reality the cable manufacturer wasn’t entirely w ong in the first place. According to


com onents, sim lify design and avoid errors in assembly, but ambiguity when it comes to cable colour coding has recently led to some confusion.


The DESINA standard was created by members of the German M chine Tool Bui Association (VDW) i


anaging director of Motor cluding the drives, control


DESINA orange cable is for servo systems and so n this sense the m nufacturer w s correct to give these cables for servo an orange sheath. The thing i DESINA also stipulates that al cable that i


specifical for m asuring and


SINA orange cable is for servo systems and so iin this sense the manufacturer was correct to give these cables for servo an orange sheath. The thing is, DESINA also stipulates that all cable that is specifically for measuring and feedback functions should be green, so real y the cable m nufacturer w s, in fact, correct to m ke the change.


The DESINA standard stipulates the following colour coding for cables used on industrial achinery, plant and equipment:


SCREENED system SCREENED CABLES ABLES


Orange, (RAL 2003), for servo applications Green, (RAL 6018), for measuring and feedback systems Violet, (R


ange, (RAL 2003), for servo applications een, (RA 6018), for m asuring and feedback


Violet, (RAL 4001), for fieldbus and hybrid cables4001), for fieldbus and hybrid cables UNSCREENED ABLES


UNSCREENED CABLES Yellow (R ack, (R


Yellow,, (RAL 1021), for sensors Black, (RAL 9005), for power Grey, (RAL 7040), for 24V control


1021), for sensors ), for pow


Grey, (RAL 7040), for 24V control


coatings. It is u ed throu iginally created


subsidiary of the R L Institute.


The RAL systemof colour coding, used by DESINA, is a colour matching system used in Europe maiEurope mainly for defining varnish and powder coatings. It is used throughout industry and was originally created by the German RAL GmbH,, a subsidiary of the RAL Institute.


DESINA,


The RAL system of colour coding, used by a colour matching systemused i y for defining varnish and powder t in


the G rman


stry an L G


a


The DESINA standard stipulates the fol wing colour coding for cables used on i dustrial machinery, plant and equipment:


h i


feedback functions should be green, so really the cable manufacturer was, in fact, correct to make the change.


r i you’re not sure.


Being aware of what the colours are meant to ndicate is useful, but it shouldn’t be a substitute for being thoroughly aware of a cable’s exact specifications and the use for w


Being aware of w at the colours arem ant to iindicate is useful, but i shouldn’t be a substitute for being thoroughly aware of a cable’s exact specifications and the use for which it was


intended. For example, some cable manufacturers are now offering grey cables, w th screen, for use as feedback cables. Remember, unscreened grey cables are defined as 24V control cables by DESINA. So, al ays speak to your cabl nufacturer or suppl


tended. For example, some cablem nufacturers are now offering grey cables, with screen, for use as feedback cables. Remember, unscreened grey cables are defined as 24V control cables by DESINA. So, always speak to your cable manufacturer or supplier if you’re not sure.


Motor Technology T: 0161 217 7100


T: 0161 217 7100 ontrol


tor Technology www.controlinmotion.com tion.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72