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INDUSTRY FOCUS MARINE IT’S PLAIN SAILING FOR STRUCTURAL BONDING TAPES A


lthough originally designed for the automotive sector where it is widely used in many premium-brand cars for the bonding of


structural metals, plastics and composites, over time the DuploTEC range of Structural Bonding Films from Lohmann have been adopted in


many other applications. One example is the bonding of advanced fabrics in the production of sails for yachts. Ultrasonic welding and/or stitching processes are used by some


manufacturers, however the joining of sail panels with DuploTEC tape has proved to be a more cost efficient method, the company explains. Apart from delivering the required guarantees of strength with repeatability, Lohmann states that by using DuploTEC tape, the sail panel assembly processes are greatly simplified and speeded up, delivering marked reductions in cost. The tape is resistant to UV, solvents, ageing and weather, making it ideal


for applications like sailmaking. Described as an ‘epoxy tape on a roll’, the structural bonding tape is available in eight different thicknesses ranging from 35µm to 2mm and can be specified in precision die-cuts to an accuracy of ±0.05mm in some materials. Craig Hutchings from Lohmann commented: “Most people are well aware of the advantages of epoxy for bonding, but not everyone is aware that the technology is now available on a roll or, as the majority of our customers specify it, as made-to-shape ready to fit precision die-cuts.”


Lohmann Technologies T: 01908 690837


SENSORS TORQ SENSE FOR MARINE APPLICATIONS T


orqSense wireless sensors from Sensor Technology are providing the essential data that Hydraulic Projects (Hy-Pro) needs to refine


the design of the electrically powered pump assemblies used in the high-performance hydraulic steering systems that the company supplies


for use in yachts and other small pleasure craft. Developing suitable pump assemblies for marine applications in


small vessels is challenging – the motors must operate economically as electrical power is usually derived from 12V or 24V storage batteries with limited capacity, yet the pump systems must be able to supply high power when needed to ensure that the steering systems continue to operate reliably in heavy seas and bad weather. To ensure that its products offer the best possible performance in


relation to these requirements, Hy-Pro constantly evaluates potential improvements to its pump drive systems. A crucial part of this is accurately measuring the torque delivered by the electric drive motor to the pump, under varying load conditions and over a wide range of speeds, in a purpose-built test rig. For this application, the TorqSense sensor is being used to measure the torque applied to the pump over the critical speed range of 500 to 4,000rpm. The results are displayed in real time, so that the progress of tests can be readily monitored, and are also captured and stored for more detailed analysis later with Labview software. “The TorqSense sensor has proved to be completely dependable and very accurate,” said Barry Wynn, senior design engineer at Hy-Pro. “The data it has provided us with has played an important role in helping us to refine our systems by ensuring an optimum match between the characteristics of the pump and motor over the full operating range. “In fact, the insights we’ve


gained during our tests have enabled us to further enhance the performance and reliability of our steering and autopilot systems.”


Sensor Technology www.sensors.co.uk


28 MAY 2019 | DESIGN SOLUTIONS 


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