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Adversing: 01622 699116 Editorial: 01354 461430


uPower outages or power quality issues in data centres, hospitals and industrial process plants can be devastang and lead to financial losses, damage to reputaon and reduced business.


DATA CENTRES BSEE


uReduced installation time and errors – the system is equipped with detachable terminals for all connections. It connects to 12- channel current sensors with proprietary cables. The clips supplied with the sensors ensure that cables are always in order during installation.


uScalability – WM50 can be integrated with optional modules to expand its control and communication capacity.


can therefore be scaled according to specific needs up to 96 branch circuits in any combination of three- phase and single-phase loads or two-phase and single phase loads. This approach reduces installation time by up to 75% when compared to existing solutions and affords a similar saving during commissioning.


Fast and intuive


Carlo Gavazzi has conducted extensive research among end users and suppliers to data centres and mission-critical applications. It became clear that an innovative solution to the market was required, one that offers: uinstallation time savings uspace savings over traditional metering solutions


uthe ability to combine branch circuit and mains supply monitoring


uscalable, modular monitoring uhigh speed data links between the CT block and the main meter thus reducing EMC issues The result is Carlo Gavazzi’s WM50 branch circuit monitoring system. The WM50 is a complete solution for data centres and critical load applications. While the base unit monitors the mains supply, its two branch buses link up to eight 12- channel split-core current transformer (CT) blocks. The system


The system configuration is extremely fast and intuitive: by following the graphical suggestions of the proprietary software or app, any different topological panel configuration can be easily made. All data can be transmitted to the BMS or data centre monitoring system via either Modbus RTU or Modbus TCP/IP protocols.


The WM50 boasts major benefits for end users and installers: uLow measurement cost per channel – users can monitor up to 96 current channels with a single analyser thanks to the 12-channel current sensors.


uDisturbance immunity – digital communications between current sensors and WM50 ensure excellent disturbance immunity.


uGranular analysis – it provides total and single load measurements (up to 96 current channels).


uClarity – the wide backlit LCD display clearly shows the measurements and the configuration parameter values.


uQuick configuration – the proprietary UCS configuration software (desktop or mobile version) is free and permits quick system configuration and diagnostics. An optical port is also available for quick analyser configuration. The data centre market is booming and with it the need for a quick and cost-effective means of monitoring power quality in such mission-critical applications. Carlo Gazazzi has built on its experience in these markets to offer an extremely flexible, scalable, compact, easy and intuitive solution.


www.carlogavazzi.co.uk


Why are power quality issues such as


harmonics important? Let’s take data centres as an example. There are two key issues in any data centre: equipment reliability and running costs and problems with harmonics will have a detrimental impact on both.





VISIT OUR WEBSITE: www.bsee.co.uk


BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER SEPTEMBER 2018 37


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