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NEWS


Contractors urged to take advantage of new free training


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ue to increasing demand, Potterton Commercial has introduced new training dates for its Sirius three, Paramount five and Eurocondense five boiler ranges. In addition, Andrews Water Heaters has added more dates to its MAXXflo and ECOflo training sessions.


A recent survey revealed that 87 per cent of installers and heating engineers highlighted free training as being the most important asset a manufacturer can offer its customers. Therefore, held at Baxi Heating’s Commercial Training Academy in Warwick, the single day courses are free to attend and are packed with useful insights and hands-on experience to ensure maximum learning in minimum time.


The Sirius three training course covers the installation requirements, commissioning and maintenance of Potterton Commercial’s comprehensive range of condensing boilers. During the free training, engineers will become familiar with single and cascade installation, flueing types and flue accessories,


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and electrical supply and controls connections. The Sirius three course also covers appliance commissioning (including flue gas analysing and combustion adjustment), how to carry out an annual service, understanding the sequence of operation, using the boiler Human Machine Interface (HMI) as well as identifying faults and accessing fault codes and history. To find out more and to book on a training course, please visit:


www.pottertoncommercial.co.uk/training or www.andrewswaterheaters.co.uk/training


Looking beyond coal with decentralised energy solutions


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ollowing news that Britain has gone a week without using coal to generate electricity for the first time since 1882, the country needs to continue identifying sustainable and stable energy sources. The UK government is committed to phasing out coal-fired power by 2025, meaning alternative energy solutions must be implemented to make up the energy shortfall. Yet as well as being more environmentally- friendly, any coal replacement needs to be affordable and secure. Considering that UK manufacturing energy costs have risen over 37 per cent in the last five years, it is crucial that any prospective alternative balances long-term sustainability with short-term financial viability. According to a recent report from Aggreko, decentralised energy solutions may offer an answer. Whether through solar power, combined heat and power (CHP) systems, or wind power, decentralised energy technologies enable users to generate energy on-site and lessen overreliance on the national grid. As well as reducing energy consumption and enabling more flexible demand, these solutions can ensure security of supply while lowering overall carbon emissions. Historically, a potential barrier to adopting a decentralised energy technology has been the prohibitively high investment costs associated with purchasing a system.


However, Aggreko is encouraging UK energy decision-makers to consider long-term hire as a solution. By doing so, they can reap the benefits of decentralised energy for comparatively less cost, as Chris Rason, managing director, Northern Europe, explains: “The UK has some of the most ambitious climate change targets in the world, and the fact the country has gone an entire week without combusting coal is welcome news. We are all on the same journey when it comes to meeting these commitments, and identifying more sustainable and efficient energy generation technologies will help hugely in this. “Decentralised energy solutions offer a tantalising glimpse of a future where companies can generate their own energy, adhere to their sustainability targets and sell their surplus back to the grid. Though this technology already exists, cost is a significant barrier to its implementation. We hope that by providing a long-term hire solution, we can provide a bridging gap between current overreliance on the national grid, and a future of secure power generated on-site.” To download ‘Bridging The Energy Gap’ and find out more about the opportunities offered by decentralised energy, the barriers to its adoption and UK industry attitudes to decentralised energy solutions, visit: www.aggreko.com/energygap


iogas Products has secured an order to design, supply and install two membrane gas holders at Hull WwTW, for Yorkshire Water contractor JN Bentley. This comes shortly after the West Midlands based anaerobic digestion specialist was awarded a similar contract to install a new membrane gas holder at Oldham WwTW, for United Utilities framework contractor Nomenca.


The plans to upgrade and extend the current anaerobic digestion at the Hull site, are part of a wider £30M investment programme by Yorkshire Water. The new gas holders will provide an additional 3000m3


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biogas storage, which will generate renewable energy to power the wastewater site and potentially, in the future, surrounding homes and businesses.


Biogas Products is working with Yorkshire- based membrane manufacturer Power Plastics on the project.


Martin Newey, managing director, Biogas Products, explains: “We no longer need to import these technologies from overseas. We have the knowledge, expertise and


manufacturing capabilities right here in the UK. “The water industry were the pioneers of AD in the UK, as a way to process sewage waste. As the biogas industry has developed, they are now investing in upgrading their existing technologies to enable them to better utilise their biogas by generating electricity or upgrading to biomethane.” Biogas Products has also been awarded a contract to design, manufacture and install four sludge/hot water tube and shell heat exchangers on the site which will be used to maintain digester temperatures.


National Ventilation wins ‘Best Energy Saving Product’ at the EW Awards


ational Ventilation, a leading UK- based ventilation manufacturer and supplier, has triumphed at the recent Electrical Wholesaler Awards 2019. The company’s Monsoon IntelliSystem Heat Recovery Unit took home the ‘Best Energy Saving Product’ award while its Monsoon Zone 1 Silence Range was also highly commended in the ‘Best New Product’ category. The Somerset-based company received the accolades on Thursday 9 May 2019 at the Tower Hotel in central London. Attended by the biggest names in the electrical sector the event was hosted by comedian Sean Collins. Competition in this year’s Electrical Wholesaler Awards was fierce, with a record number of entries and a huge number of votes across both manufacturer and supplier categories, with decisions proving tough in the judged categories. National Ventilation kicked off the awards ceremony collecting a trophy for a new category, ‘Best Energy Saving Product’. Awarded for its Monsoon IntelliSystem Heat Recovery Unit, the entry


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scored well with both voters and the expert judging panel for the unit’s technical and practical excellence.


“We are thrilled to have won the ‘Best Energy Saving Product’ at these key industry awards. To have the IntelliSystem Heat Recovery Unit chosen as the best energy saving product by electrical wholesalers, who voted for the winners of the awards, is the icing on the cake,” said Mick Daniels, sales director at National Ventilation. “It’s wonderful feedback from the industry that our customers love our products and we are very thankful for this mark of support.”


BSEE


UK AD specialist Biogas Products secures multiple gas holder installations


Read the latest at: www.bsee.co.uk


BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER JUNE 2019 7


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