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FEATURE DATA ACQUISITION Overcome crushing problems with DAQ


When Terex MPS needed a reliable and flexible system to measure stress on its range of stone crushing machines, it turned to HBM to provide a comprehensive and effective solution


when large stones, often up to one cubic metre, are dropped from the excavator which is used to feed it; this opens up the risk of damaging the part. Moreover, the crusher itself is subject to forces of up to 8,000kN during the crushing process. “To deal with all these issues, we initially


T


erex Corporation is a global manufacturer of lifting and material


processing products and services. Made up of various divisions such as cranes, aerial work, platforms and materials processing, Terex MPS provides a complete range of crushing and screening equipment to customers around the world. Designed to meet the toughest


demands, Terex MPS tracked mobile jaw crushers offer excellent capabilities in the reduction and sizing of aggregates for construction materials and also recycling construction waste. As part of its ongoing research towards


the development of this powerful and reliable range, HBM was asked to consult on the LJ5139, which will be the largest tracked mobile machine in its range when fully developed. Primarily designed to process virgin rock and ore, the LJ5139 can also be used to process construction waste. Consisting of a single toggle jaw crusher, the LJ5139 features a range of support parts, which include a 1.4m wide main conveyor belt, a wear resistant steel hopper and feeder with a 12m² hopper capacity, a power pack with an engine power of 361kW and engine speed of 1,540rpm, an undercarriage with a dual speed tracking which allows the jaw crusher mobility of up to 1km/h and galvanised access platforms and ladders for full maintenance service access. As an additional option, users can also incorporate a magnetic separator belt, a by-pass conveyor belt and an independent pre-screen to the jaw crusher. The issues being faced by the LJ5139 Jaw


Crusher, which was tracked and being used in a quarry, were varying in nature. With the machine itself weighing up to 110 tonnes, the chassis is subject to high loads when tracking across the quarry on uneven surfaces. In addition, the hopper and feeder receives high impact forces


14 MAY 2018 | INSTRUMENTATION 


When fully developed, the LJ5139 will be the largest tracked mobile machine in Terex Corporation’s range


made use of the Finite Element Analysis during the design process, and then verified the results in the field using strain gauges in order to shorten the test and development period before the machine is released into production. We previously rented the required test equipment to meet our needs. However we were keen to move away from this practice by investing in our own equipment, which has given us increased flexibility,” says Ian Boast from Terex Corporation. Furthermore, the initial equipment being hired was also susceptible to noise interference from surrounding equipment. This was particularly problematic as the loadings in the crusher are often random and transient in nature and this could potentially cause confusion and false results. In addition to this, the physical environment in the quarry, which is arduous with high levels of dust, not only limits the test options on site, but also requires extra care to be undertaken with the conventional equipment being used.


HBM specified its rugged DAQ, SomatXR, which is particularly suitable for use in harsh conditions


HBM’S SOLUTIONS HBM was invited to survey the situation and provide a viable solution. After a thorough study of the issues faced, HBM specified its rugged data acquisition (DAQ) system, the SomatXR series, which


is particularly suitable for use in harsh environments. To compliment this package, HBM also suggested the Somat MX1615B-R module and related accessories, which included RF-9 strain gauge rosettes. “Given the demanding environment,


it was important that we chose the correct equipment,” explains Greg Todd, mobile data acquisition specialist. “Often faced with wet and arduous conditions, the ability to operate reliably under harsh conditions and sudden impacts was a key consideration for the customer when it came to suggesting the Somat XR system.” The SomatXR data acquisition


system is specially developed for use in harsh environments. The modules provide a wide temperature range and are protected from humidity, dust, shock and vibration. The data acquisition system provides


a web interface for simple operation without any software installation. This allows for convenient channel parameterisation, monitoring of measurement jobs and visualisation of measured data far away from the measuring point. This was a particularly significant feature for Terex MPS given the nature of the measurement task. Another factor which was taken into


consideration when specifying the Somat XR series was its operating conditions. For instance, when operating under such extreme conditions, it is often hard to anticipate all of the problems that may occur, such as losing measurement data due to unforeseen events like a power failure. This is a particularly relevant feature in terms of long term tests, such as those required by Terex MPS, as the SomatXR system enables data to be


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