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Flow, level & control


level measUrement solUtions For comPressor lUbrication tanks


Natural gas compression is a crucial process along many points of the refining and distribution process, from aiding wellhead production to facilitating gathering and processing operations. In order to keep these processes running smoothly, the compressors need to function consistently and effectively. Compressor lubrication systems protect compressor components from increased amounts of wear and deposit formation and help the equipment run cooler and more efficiently. A wide range of engine lubricants formulated


with different base oils are available for use in compressors. Lubricants vary by ISO grade, viscosity, flash point, and formulation. Lubricating fluids are typically stored in integral stainless steel and carbon steel tanks and in remote bulk storage tanks that are monitored for level.


LeveL MeasureMent ChaLLenges and Considerations


Level monitoring of lubricant reservoirs will ensure the proper functioning of compressors. Wide temperature shifts in integral reservoirs can affect media density and may exclude some level technologies, such as pressure transmitters. Because ISO cleanliness levels increase lube change frequency, controls should be easy to remove and maintain.


LeveL MeasureMent soLutions


Magnetrol has produced level measurement solutions for compressor lubrication tanks. For point level there is the Echotel


Model 961 ultrasonic switch; the Thermatel Model TD1/TD2 thermal dispersion switch; or the Tuffy II float-actuated switch. For continuous level, Magnetrol has the Eclipse Model 706 guided wave radar transmitter ; the Pulsar Model R86 non-contact radar transmitter ; or the Jupiter JM4 magnetostrictive transmitter. And for visual indication there are the Atlas or Aurora magnetic level indicators.


www.magnetrol.com


Ultrasonic Flow meter For Process measUrement and monitoring


Using patented ultrasonic flow meter technology that enables it to operate accurately over wide flow ranges, the Process Atrato from Titan Enterprises incorporates an advanced signal processing system permitting both viscous and non-viscous fluids to be metered. The Process Atrato is a compact flow meter designed to provide fast response time,


high sensitivity and wide flow range linearity - all in an IP65 (NEMA 4X) enclosure. With no moving par ts the highly reliable Process Atrato flow meter is a cost-effective device for engineers looking to monitor the flow of liquids in industrial processes. Features of the Process Atrato include an IP65 sealed enclosure, two frequency


outputs of PNP and NPN, two multicolour LED light indicators (for pulse outputs, power malfunctions, and signal strength), and standard M12 four pin sensor connector for electrical connections. Rated for use up to 65°C and 20Bar, the compact Process Atrato is available in four


models operating over flow ranges from 2ml / min to 15 litres / min, featuring an accuracy of ± one per cent over the whole flow range. Each Process Atrato is calibrated with a pre-set 'K' factor so all meters of the same flow range are fully interchangeable simplifying assembly and set-up procedures for OEM manufacturers looking to integrate the flow meter into their process and control set-up.


www.flowmeters.co.uk 40 April 2019 Instrumentation Monthly


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