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Water monitoring


First WRAS ‘certified’ submersible level sensor V


EGA Controls is has announced another innovative first for the water sector. They have achieved


the first ever WRAS approval of a submersible pressure sensor as a whole device. This means a full product certificate number registration and listing on the WRAS approved product list. The VEGAWELL submersible pressure sensor is the first and only transmitter of this type to be fully WRAS certified and meets the requirements of Regulation 31 (4)(b). The WRAS certification means it will not contaminate or harbour microbial growth when used in potable or drinking water. This enables it to be deployed anywhere on the water supply chain: from the heart of a water treatment facility, to monitoring in the network or measurement of drinking water on a business premises.


WRAS explAined


What is WRAS ? It is the Water Regulations Advisory Scheme and it is a conformance mark that demonstrates that an item complies with high standards set out in the UK water regulations established in 1999. It is enforced by the UK water supply companies. It covers all plumbing systems, water fittings, and equipment supplied, or to be supplied, with water from the public water supply. The Water Regulations 1999 (and within those Regulation 31) are enforced by the UK water supply companies (who essentially act as appointed/authorised enforcement for the UK Government) and this is the fundamental legal requirement. A WRAS approval number is a way of proving that the item meets a par t of the above legislation. Of course it needs to be used in an appropriate way to meet those regulations too.


lAboRAtoRy teSted


Uniquely for this type of sensor, it has been fully laboratory tested and assessed as a complete device/assembly.


30 April 2019 Instrumentation Monthly


This was on top of the materials of the individual components, which included testing and scrutiny of their composition, design and surface finishes. A newly cer tified material has also been added, the 99.9 per cent pure CERTEC Sapphire ceramic that makes up the sensor diaphragm of the sensor. This is what makes the measurement of these devices so highly accurate and repeatable with almost zero-drift, yet extremely robust, pressure-shock and overload resistant. The VEGAWELL WRAS cer tified transmitter is now capable of cost effective, safe level and pressure measurement of drinking water throughout the supply chain. With ranges from 0.1 Bar to 60 Bar, it is extremely versatile, and suitable applications include clean water reservoirs, pump control, storage or small header tanks and associated pipework, found either in the water company supply or end users on- site storage or ‘towns water’ buffer tanks. Additionally, it features integrated


lightning protection as standard, PE cable lengths up to 1,000m, as well as an optional PT100 output for water temperature measurement. For fur ther information or a


demonstration about the product, cer tification and its capabilities, contact VEGA Controls. Ray Tregale, managing director of


VEGA Controls says, “This is an impor tant first for us and our customers who want to use submersible pressure sensors in drinking water supply. We want to distinguish the difference of this cer tification - we put in a lot of time and effor t to achieve it - as many manufacturers designate sensors as ‘approved’, but in reality they are not WRAS cer tified or listed on the WRAS website.” He adds, “The cer tification of the VEGAWELL 52 also gives water supply companies peace of mind as it also conforms to Regulation 31 (4)(b)” from the DWI.“


VEGA Controls www.vega.com/uk


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