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HEAVY DUTY MOVING FEATURE These problems can be nearly, if not entirely eliminated, by


using modern modular chargers that have a power factor close to one.


• MAINTAINING VISIBILITY OF CHARGER STATUS Maintaining chargers can be time-consuming and labour intensive if each unit has to be inspected on the warehouse floor. With the right infrastructure, battery chargers can have


wireless devices installed to allow communication and easy visibility of charger status from a central location


• MINIMISING THE IMPACT OF A MODULE FAILURE While we have already seen how a modular design keeps the charger operational even if a module fails, it is still important to minimise the impact of a module failure if it does occur. Self-diagnostic functions on modular chargers flag any


failure, and fitting a new module is a simple plug-and-play operation. Standard modules are always available for rapid delivery and replacement.


• ENSURING THE CHARGER IS SET UP CORRECTLY FOR THE BATTERY IT’S CHARGING Batteries cannot be optimally charged if the charger is not set up correctly for them. Modular chargers can offer automatic identification of their


connected batteries, together with automatic switching of the output voltage. The control algorithm also enables increased efficiency and power factor control.


EnerSys www.enersys.com T: +44 (0) 1617 944 611


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MATERIALS HANDLING & LOGISTICS | MARCH 2019


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