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Company insight


40CTAS: High performance and low maintenance in the field of medium calibre


CTA International is a joint venture between BAE Systems and Nexter Systems. It has developed an innovative medium-calibre weapon system capable of incapacitating tanks and defeating infantry fighting vehicles, helicopters, small unmanned aerial systems and loitering munitions. This system provides power, compactness, flexibility and ease of integration into any type of turret. Moreover, its design facilitates less handling, training and maintenance compared with conventional medium-calibre weapons.


T


he 40CTAS is an electromechanical weapon, which makes it possible to test the correct operation of all the


system’s functions without needing to fire, unlike gas-operated weapons. When CTA International developed the weapon, it made the choice to design a mechanical recoil brake, rather than drawing from gas recuperation or hydraulics damping. Unlike gas, which tends to produce more powder residue – and therefore requires increased cleaning and additional maintenance, as vents can become clogged during use – the mechanical recoil brake chosen by CTA International reduces the need for daily and regular maintenance. Access for maintenance operations is improved via the rotating chamber of the cannon, and the possibility of cleaning the barrel either in place or after removal. In other words, access can be adapted in accordance with the means available to the maintenance technicians.


The 40CTAS can be easily integrated into a range of armoured vehicles, including the EBRC Jaguar.


only reduces the risk of firing incidents and excess handling of rounds, but also reduces the logistics footprint which, for traditional ammunition, requires the


“The mechanical recoil brake chosen by CTA International reduces the need for daily and regular maintenance.”


Another fundamental difference with the 40CTAS is its link-free ammunition feed system. The extraction and ejection function for the empty cases is reduced to its simplest form through the absence of links, and the fact that the empty case is ejected when a new round is introduced into the chamber. This configuration not


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handling and nearby storage of belts formed from a mix of rounds. What’s more, the magazine can instantly be disengaged and isolated, enabling operations to be performed on the weapon in the absence of any ammunition. The weapon is fitted with an on-board testability system, which can identify any


malfunctions, resolve them and, if necessary, allow the defective equipment to be replaced following the maintenance procedures offered by CTA International. This results in a relatively constraint-free preventive maintenance system, able to control the system’s safety (lubrication every 500 cycles, full inspection of the CTAS every 2,500 cycles, reduced list of preventive maintenance spare parts). To conclude, the maintenance workload is very low, reducing the overall cost of operation.


Supporting the end user during the maintenance process CTA International’s support system is flexible and able to adapt to the needs of its customers. The company is the design authority for the weapon system and


Defence & Security Systems International / www.defence-and-security.com


Armée de Terre/ Twitter.com


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