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From the editor


The ties that bind A


On the web...


Find recent editions, white papers and market analysis at: www.defence-and-security.com


Defence & Security Systems International Volume 1 2021


Editorial Editor Nicholas Kenny


nicholas.kenny@progressivemediainternational.com Sub-editor Lizzie Waymouth Production manager Dave Stanford Group art director Henrik Williams Designer Martin Faulkner Head of content Jake Sharp


Commercial Client services executive Ruchita Marwaha Sales manager Andrew Hinton


andrewhinton@progressivemediainternational.com Managing director William Crocker


Defence & Security Systems International is published by Progressive Media International. Registered in England No. 06212740.


John Carpenter House, John Carpenter Street, London, EC4Y OAN, UK www.defence-and-security.com


ISSN 2042-6240 © 2021


All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher and copyright owner. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, the publisher accepts no responsibility for errors or omissions. The products and services advertised are those of individual authors and are not necessarily endorsed by or connected with the publisher. The opinions expressed in the articles within this publication are those of individual authors and not necessarily those of the publisher.


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re we stronger when we stand together, or when we stand apart? This question is a key driver behind the foreign policy of nations as they struggle to balance the need for cooperation with self-reliance, support with sovereignty and interdependence with independence. It’s something we’ve seen at the heart of current US politics, as the Biden administration looks to bridge the divide between the US and its Nato allies caused by its predecessor. As part of that reconciliation, President Biden declared Nato’s Article 5, under which an attack against any member nation is deemed an attack against them all, a “sacred obligation” ahead of the summit in Brussels on 14 June. It’s a question we’ve seen in UK politics as well, with the Johnson government using its Integrated Review back in March to renew allegiances with its Nato allies and pledge to uphold its responsibilities as a permanent member of the UN Security Council. At the same time, however, Johnson sought to clarify the UK’s relationship with the EU as one “based on mutual respect for sovereignty and the UK’s freedom to do things differently, economically and politically, where that suits our interests”. The truth, however, is that no nation is truly an island, at least in the metaphorical sense. Technology, trade and travel have drawn an invisible web connecting the entire world, for better and for worse – the Covid-19 pandemic has been emblematic on both points. On one hand, the search for a vaccine involved scientists and investment from across the planet. On the other, however, decisions made by sceptical or careless governments have led to resurgences in cases and the development of mutated variants. With that in mind, read on to see some potential benefits of connectivity through technology on page 24, where we learn about how 5G networks are being used to disperse command and control, and on page 56, for why navies are looking at distributed fleets and the advantages of automation. We also discuss the ongoing development of ‘robotic wingmen’ on page 28, taking a look at the potential offered by robotic combat vehicles to support troops on the ground. On page 65, however, we take a look at how military reliance on GPS could lead to defence forces becoming compromised, as the connections that we rely on can also make us vulnerable – if we allow them to.


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Nicholas Kenny, editor


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