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Taking a Stand by


Taking a Walk This past spring, the violent killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd energized a movement that reverberated around the globe. People of all ages and backgrounds joined together to voice their anger, sadness and growing frustration over our country’s failure to address and change its longstanding systemic and institutionalized practices of racism. On the evening of June 1, more than


1,000 people gathered at Freedom Park for a Justice March that peacefully made its way through Myers Park and Queens’ campus. Members from Queens’ Senior Leadership Team, as well as others from the Queens community joined the march to reiterate its commitment to combatting inequality and racism. “We as Christians are called to do


justice, to love mercy and walk humbly with our God,” said Chaplain Emerita and Professor Emerita Diane Mowrey, who participated in the march. “To me that quotation means marching and walking for change and learning how to put love into action in the short term and the long term.” DJ White ’18, a 24-year-old admissions


counselor at Queens, commented on how somber it was when everyone kneeled for almost nine minutes (the length of time a police officer forcefully held his knee on Floyd’s neck) at Queens Road West and Selwyn Avenue. Said White, “I think as a black man that it’s certainly important to march because that could be me.” Queens is committed to combatting inequality and racism by sharing resources, engaging in conversations and educating community members on how to use their voice and advocate for change. You might find helpful this reading list, recommended by various professors and leaders at Queens.


—Lori K. Tate 3


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