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During the trip, the group traveled through Belfast and


surrounding areas, touring museums, churches and monasteries and meeting with locals to hear their personal stories. Some of the most lasting memories came from a Black Taxi Tour, where students were guided to various Belfast landmarks and shown the colorful murals that plaster the sides of the buildings in the city. Te murals on either side of the peace wall—erected to


separate predominantly Catholic and Protestant neighborhoods when violence was at its height, but which are still in place now—were vastly different. “Everyone Republican or otherwise has their own particular


role to play. Our revenge will be the laughter of our children,” read one colorful mural, quoting the late Bobby Sands, a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army.


Tose images stayed with Rosemary Takacs, a senior music therapy major originally from Massachusetts. “It’s really interesting to see these murals that have to do with the conflict are very much taking a side,” Takacs said. “And by that I mean, on the Catholic side of these peace walls, it’ll have historical figures that made strides that would better the Catholic community—and vice versa on the Protestant side. … And this is something that Belfast residents walk past every day. So this conflict is kind of in their faces, whether they want it to be or not.” One of the requirements of the trip was to keep a daily


journal throughout the 11- day tour of Ireland. Mowrey provided prompts for students to be more reflective than simply recounting a daily diary of events and sites toured.


ADAM MOORE, MARCH 5, DAY 6 28


There is nothing wrong with being proud of your history, but when are you going to move on from that and use that history as motivation to create more positive history for future generations to be proud of and not just be OK with settling for what happened in the past and not in the future?


MAGAZINE


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