search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PUBLIC POLICY


Energy Laws May Affect Your Senior Living Community


By Marla Thalheimer, RE Tech Advisors


A growing number of cities and states across the country are taking action to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and drive market transformation through energy efficiency laws and regulations. While details vary slightly across the spectrum, the basic re- quirement is for owners, managers, and op- erators of buildings, including senior living communities, to benchmark utility usage to understand the level of efficiency and report


that information to the city/state/county. In many cases this information is being made available to the public with the intent on creating awareness and generating com- petition. Some cities, including New York and Chicago, have additional requirements such as energy audits and lighting upgrades over time. New York and Chicago are also working toward energy grades to be posted “in a prominent location” starting in 2019.


Advocates Argentum For You While this concept may seem daunting at


first glance, benchmarking utility usage to understand how your community performs against peers and against itself over time is a worthwhile exercise, even if it is not required. According to the EPA, buildings that were benchmarked consistently for three years reduced energy use by an average of 2.4 per- cent per year for a total of 7 percenti


. If the av- erage senior living community pays $100,000 U.S. Building Benchmarking & Transparency Policies Seattle Portland Minneapolis Evanston


Cook County


Berkley Francisco San Denver Los Angeles Atlanta


Kansas City, MO


St. Louis Salt Lake City Boulder Chicago Pittsburgh


NJ DE


South Portland


Cambridge Portland


New York City Boston


Philadelphia


Washington, DC Montgomery Co., MD


Austin Orlando


HI


Source: BuildingRating.org offers in-depth information about each jurisdiction’s policies and programs and provides interactive features to compare policies. BuildingRating.org is maintained by the Institute for Market Transformation (IMT). ©Copyright 2018 Institute for Marketing Transformation.


56 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


Public, commercial, and multifamily building benchmarking policy adopted Public and commerical building benchmarking policy adopted Public buildings benchmarked


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64