search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
of boys and 62 percent of girls are exposed to pornography in a digital forum. Seventy-one percent of teens have done something to hide their online activity from their parents (go to fightthenewdrug.org).


 Poor school performance: Scientific studies have demonstrated a negative


relationship between social media use and GPA, with most finding that daily social media users are more likely to have a lower GPA than an intermittent user of social media. So, what can parents do? First, model being a good digital


citizen. Show your kids what healthy consumption of social media looks like. Respect your teen's boundaries by asking permission before posting pho- tos and/or stories about him. Limiting the amount of time you spend digitally connected provides a healthy counter- balance to the technology-obsessed world and strengthens the parent-child bond. If children feel their parents are distracted and inaccessible, they can turn to a world of information available to them online, much of it inaccurate and not developmentally appropriate. Second, set tech-free zones and


tech-free hours. Start small, by elimi- nating phone usage at the table during meal times. If you are ready to kick it up a notch, ban phone usage in the car. The ride to and from school can be an important connection time for conversation. Have your teens check their phones in at night and try to stop social media use at least an hour before bedtime. Third, do basic safety checks. Be


sure all social media profiles are set to private. Use a stock photo for the





profile picture. Check your teen's phone for apps that can be consid- ered dangerous. Some allow users to hide selected apps on a smartphone, so icons will not be visible to parents spot-checking a phone. Consider using a professional


service to monitor your child's online activity. You can also check with your cellular provider for tools offered, as well as control settings in app stores to prevent downloading some apps. Many social media user agreements stipulate a certain age. Allowing a younger child to have an account is a violation of the user agreement and can preclude you from protective services. There are still many ways digitally


savvy teens can bypass safety measures. No software can replace the value of open conversation and healthy parental relationships.


Social media certainly has its


benefits. Fifty-two percent of teens feel it strengthens their relationships with friends. Today’s teens also care deeply about charitable causes, where social media can be used. It can help to forge relational connections, maintain long- distance friendships and stir sweet memories.


Social media is here to stay, and we can help our kids acquire healthy skills and habits in learning to use it respon- sibly — to have a positive impact on themselves and their community.


Jessica Peck, DNP, RN, CPNP-PC, CNE, CNL, is an Associate Professor at Texas A&M University and has been practicing in pediatrics for more than 20 years. She is currently the NAPNAP secretary.





ISTOCK.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108