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the nose of one out of every three people, according to the CDC. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is staph that are resistant to certain antibiotics, making it a challenge to treat. In the general com- munity, MRSA skin infections are common. Although MRSA doesn’t survive long in properly treated swimming water, it can still spread through direct contact, touching another person’s MRSA infection, or indi- rect contact by sharing items or touching surfaces contaminated with it. Frequent handwashing, as well as not sharing towels, sports gear and other items, is key to helping to prevent a MRSA infection. If you suspect a MRSA infection, cover the area with a bandage and contact your child’s provider for evaluation and treatment. Sports involving close contact make the


spread of skin infections easy and all too common. They can also be transmitted through shared equipment. Skin infections can yank your athlete out of the game.


 Herpes gladiatorum, also known as mat herpes, is spread by direct skin-to-skin


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contact with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the same virus that causes cold sores on the lips. Lesions generally appear within eight days of exposure. Some kids may experience a sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, fever or tingling on the skin where the future lesions will erupt. They appear as a cluster of blisters to the face, head, neck, extremities or trunk. Frequent handwashing and showering immediately after a sporting event will help prevent infection. If your child develops any signs or symptoms, especially involving the eye or surrounding area, notify your provider right away. Although the herpes virus can have inactive, dormant periods, when an outbreak does occur it can be treated with medication prescribed by your provider.


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Athlete + summer = mountains of sweaty clothes, locker room showers, foul-smelling gear and the risk of getting a fungal infec- tion. Ringworm, athlete’s foot and jock itch are different skin infections known collectively as tinea. Caused by fungi called dermatophytes that live on skin, hair and nails, they thrive in warm, moist areas. They are shared in locker rooms and in public showers, and through sports gear and towels. Symptoms and treatment vary depending on where the infection appears. Not a worm, ringworm gets its name


from the ring-like rash it causes. Called tinea capitis when found on the scalp and tinea corporis on the body, it has a scaly, red, circular appearance and it itches. Balding will occur to affected areas with tinea capitis. See your provider regarding treatment for either form, if infected. Tinea pedis, commonly known as


athlete’s foot, typically affects the soles of the feet, between the toes and sometimes


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