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ones showing us how to use our phones. It’s possible to be a tech-savvy parent in a digital native world. To give some cultural context to the


explosion of social media, consider that Facebook currently has 1.18 billion daily active users worldwide. An astonish- ing 3.25 billion hours of YouTube videos are viewed each month. Twitter boasts more than 317 million daily active users who send more than 500 million tweets per day. That’s 6,000 tweets per second! The Oxford Word of the Year in 2009 was unfriend, which means "the elimination of a friend on social media" and, in 2015, the panel selected Face with Tears of Joy Emoji as the Word of the Year — and it’s not even a word! Today’s teenagers spend approximately nine hours each day consuming some form of digital media. The average teen spends five hours per week taking selfies. A teen will take more than 25,000 selfies in her lifetime. Consider the messages of social media: Facebook: "Like me!" YouTube: "Watch me!" LinkedIn: "Hire me!" Instagram: "Follow Me!" It's all about ME! Although social media can play a vital


role in strengthening social connections, there is a darker, more troubling side.


 Permanent digital footprint: This is the permanent trail users of social media leave


the moment they sign into any service. Teens often have a false sense of anonym- ity online, but one moment of poor judg- ment can persist for a lifetime. A popular app posts for short periods of time before "disappearing," but followers can easily capture a screenshot and have permanent custody of the digital image. Thirty-five percent of colleges screen social media profile usage and report problematic findings that affect admission


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decisions.


 Cyberbullying: Bullying used to occur mainly in school hallways and on play- grounds. With the advent of social media, bullies now have 24/7 access to their se- lected victims, and are often emboldened by posting something online they may not have had the courage to say in person. Thirty-nine percent of online teens report being cyberbullied in some way, com- pared with 22 percent of teens without an online presence.


 Health issues: Social media use in teens ages 11 to 17 has been linked to dimin-


ished sleep quality and elevated levels of anxiety and depression. "Facebook De- pression" is a phrase that first originated in an American Academy of Pediatrics report that chronicled various suscepti- bilities of teens with low self-esteem. Avid social media users often see themselves through the prism of "how many likes" they can get compared to their peers. "Text neck" is a term now being used to describe neck pain and damage sustained from looking down at wireless devices.


 Sexting: This is defined as sending a sexually explicit photo or message in a


digital forum. Approximately 25 percent of teens have engaged in sexting, and 55 percent of those admit to sharing the images with others. Not only can this cause severe psychological trauma -- some states consider possession of such images to be a felony. "Revenge porn" is posting these sexts to various social media sites after a relationship has ended. Additionally, sexual predators are increas- ingly using social media to find, stalk and assault victims, often spending months or even years "grooming" a victim.


 Pornography: Ninety-three percent 


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