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ISTOCK.COM


THE X & O OF WARM-WEATHER SKINCARE By Francine Bono-Neri, MA, RN, PNP


PLAYBOOK Summer O


ut with the jackets, in with the swim- suits. It’s summertime! Nothing beats


these fun-filled weeks with your children. Memories are in the making while ev- eryone is splashing at water parks and beaches and you’re cheering your kids on at games and practice. Warm-weather activities may cause or aggravate skin con- ditions, and protecting against the ones that follow is your children’s first line of defense. You may feel protected in chemically


treated water and may think that beaches and lakes are too large to harbor anything harmful. However, according to the Cen- ters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recreational water illnesses (RWI) are caused by various germs found in swimming water. RWI are transmitted by ingestion, inhalation or contact with con- taminated water from treated and untreated water sources, and can affect kids (and grown-ups) by causing a wide variety of infections — including ear, respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin and wound infections. Here are some opponents to watch for.


Hot Tub Rash Hot tub rash is an infection of the skin’s hair follicles, causing itchy, red bumps and tender, pus-filled blisters. Occurring after prolonged exposure to contaminated water — often with the germ 


 — this rash usually appears within a few days of exposure. It is found in poorly maintained hot tubs and all recre- ational swimming venues. Taking frequent breaks and rinsing immediately after swimming will help stop it. If your child develops a rash that lasts longer than a few days, consult your healthcare provider. Follow safety recommendations from


The Association of Pool & Spa Professionals (APSP), including reducing temperature from the maximum 104 degrees to 98 de- grees and only using the tub in 15-minute segments. Excessive heat can contribute to skin conditions, including burns.


Eczema Excessive summer heat, along with chemi- cals used to treat water, can affect chil- dren’s skin, especially those with eczema. Eczema is a noncontagious, inflammatory, itchy skin condition producing a hyper- sensitivity rash. During swimming, afflicted areas are generally submerged. Chlorine and other chemicals can have a drying effect, further aggravating eczema. If your child has eczema, note and discuss any worsening conditions with your provider.


Staphylococcus Aureus or staph, are bacteria commonly found on the skin or in


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