search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems



hen you hear the word barbecue, you imagine hot dogs, macaroni and


cheese, potato salad, chips, ice cream and soda. But barbecues can be yummy — and healthy.


 You can change a typical barbecue menu to offer more nutritious options. Instead of chips, serve fresh grapes. Substitute grilled sweet potatoes for potato salad. Try a delicious cheese dip served with fresh apple slices rather than a sweet dessert. Grilling can be the perfect time to try items that you may not consider traditional barbecue foods, such as grilled pineapples and peaches. Grilled vegetables are also very easy to make and add color and nutrition to your menu. Choose your favorite seasonal veggies, clean, toss with a little olive oil and grill until tender.


 Grill safety is essential for a fun, safe barbecue experience. Never leave your younger children unattended near a grill, even one that is cooling down. Teach your kids to maintain a three-foot safety zone around a grill while adults are cooking. Even older kids need this reminder as they are racing around the yard and may lose perspective of the grill’s location. Once you’ve finished grilling, be sure the coals are cold before you dispose of them. This is especially important when you’re pouring them onto the ground, as hot coals could start a fire. The Department of Agriculture has


important guidelines for keeping your grilled foods safe. Do not marinate foods at room temperature or outside. Always keep marinating foods in the refrigerator. Do not use the same plate that held the raw





marinating meat to hold the cooked meat because bacteria from the raw meat could spread to the cooked food. Always have a clean plate ready for cooked food. Wash your hands and any utensils or dishes with warm water and antibacterial soap if you think they may have come in contact with meat or meat juices, to prevent spreading bacteria and germs.


 Take general precautions to make your barbecue a success. The Food and Drug Administration and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) suggest basic precautions when preparing foods. First: Clean. Wash your hands before and after preparing food. Children can wash their hands with you while singing their ABCs to wash for the recommended minimum 10 to 20 seconds. Wash fresh fruits and vegetables under cold running water, even if you plan to peel the outer skin. Next: Separate. Bacteria and viruses are


easily transferred from our bodies to our food. You may be tempted to taste the salad you are preparing, and then put the fork back into the salad without washing the fork. This is a bad idea because bacteria and viruses can be transferred from your mouth to the food. Germs can also be transferred from one food to another. If you are cutting raw meat to grill, wash your hands, the knife and the cutting board before peeling fruits such as apples or slicing watermelon. These are all healthy food options — just be sure to wash your knife with hot, soapy water before reusing it to prepare fruit. Keep raw and cooked foods separate from one another. The third step is: Cook. Eggs and meats should be cooked thoroughly. Use a meat thermometer to ensure that your food is fully





ISTOCK.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108