search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIFE BY LEXUS 36


Originally built as a garçonnière (a bachelor’s


residence), L’ilot has been in Tatiana’s family for more than 30 years. It originally belonged to her uncle, who had a brood of eight children, with whom Tatiana spent many a school holiday. “I have wonderful memories of leisurely Christmas lunches at long tables under the trees, where my uncle performed various operatic songs while we kids caught crabs and bigorneaux [periwinkles] on the rocks for fi sh soup,” she recalls.


A DEEP, WIDE HISTORY Back then, houses at the sea didn’t come with the


creature comforts they do today. “Mauritian people used to call them campements because, at that time, most people lived on the higher part of the island and literally camped out here on weekends,” says Tatiana. “In fact, L’ilot was a very simple place then, its claim to fame being a noisy generator that could be heard in nearby Roches Noires!” Born in Mauritius to a French aristocratic mother


and a Russian architect father who designed many of the island’s fi rst hotels, she grew up in a large, wooden maison creole house furnished in the compagnie des indes style, so she has more than a passing interest in design and architecture. Trained as an engineer and now working in real estate investment, she’s spent much of her life between Paris and Mauritius. “I was schooled in Paris and built up my career in real estate investment there, but I’ve come back to Mauritius as often as possible. It’s always been a powerful antidote to my life in France,” she says.


1 2 J


ust off the east coast of Mauritius, property developer Tatiana Schaub has created an idyllic island home that offers the perfect antidote to her busy life in Paris. But how she ever manages


to leave her magnificent Mauritian idyll, L’ilot, and return to her life in France is beyond us! First there’s the remarkable island site, with


sole access via a narrow bridge which affords absolute privacy and a feeling of being adrift at sea. Then there’s the house itself, a wood-and- stone barefoot luxe affair that hunkers down on a bed of volcanic stone, surrounded by natural rock pools and a fringe of palm and pine trees. But the jewel in the crown must surely be the seductive sequence of Indian Ocean views that vie for your attention through every window, door and room.


A DIFFERENT KIND OF REAL “Down-to-earth, yet luxurious” is the only way to


sum up this place. Tatiana’s ensured that every comfort and convenience necessary for utter relaxation is on hand, without sacrificing that most essential of holiday ingredients: an altered reality. Here daily routines revolve around regular


dips in the sea, reading, lunch on the verandah and obligatory afternoon snoozes. “I can be here for an entire week without crossing the bridge once,” says Tatiana. “Ali, the fisherman, brings lobster and fresh fish daily and Teeram, who sells the most delicious rotis, is a regular visitor on his bike. My housekeeper brings whatever else I may need, such as fresh bread and vegetables.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101