search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROFILE A


s a specialist in putting classic “American muscle” and super-cars under the hammer, Mast regularly generates double or treble


the expected price. This smooth-talking salesman


auctioned the Batmobile from the fi rst Batman movie for a mind-boggling $6,4 million and raised $100 000 for the Bumblebee, from the Transformers movie. Other movie star cars he’s auctioned came from The Fast and the Furious series, some perhaps a little bashed and battered. When he sold a car owned by


Steve Tyler, frontman of rock band Aerosmith, the deal included an overnight stay at the singer’s home for the successful bidder. If you’re buying a car, on the


other hand, perhaps you don’t want motormouth Mast on the podium, because you might get carried away and spend twice as much as intended. There’s a well-recognised mood


called the “auction phenomenon”, when people get swept away and bid well beyond what an item’s technically worth. “That’s part of what we do. We try to


create that frenzy and that atmosphere where you don’t necessarily bid based on what you think the value of something is, but on what you want. It doesn’t matter that it’s worth $2 500 – you’re going to pay $3 000 because you’re there that day, you want that specifi c one and you’re having fun doing it,” he says. Mast runs his own company, Mast


Auctioneers in Ohio, specialising in cars, real estate and thoroughbred racehorses. He also hires himself and his team out to Barrett-Jackson, which runs the world’s greatest classic car auctions. It attracts enthusiasts from around the globe and is screened live on the Discovery and Velocity TV channels. Up to 400 000 people attend its sales in Scottsdale, Arizona, in the course of a week, when about 1 800 cars are on the block. Quite what constitutes a classic car


seems to be debatable. Mast defi nes it as “anything that’s collectable, anything that’s rare, anything that’s just old but well kept. People’s defi nitions of ‘classic’ can be wide-ranging: some people fall in love with a car and suddenly they think it’s classic.” Even after 18 years in the trade,


some sales are unexpected. “We take vehicles that we don’t think will have much value and suddenly we fi nd that everybody wants it. We sold a vehicle last year that should have been worth $30 000, but ended up bringing in $250 000 simply because two rivals fell in love with it. That’s what they remember driving as youngsters.


25


WORDS: LESLEY STONES. IMAGES: BARRETT-JACKSON.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101