search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIFE BY LEXUS 28


JAPAN: A WALK IN THE WOODS Sarah Duff explores the contemplative escape of


walking the Kumano Kodō A


mong the dense forests of central Japan’s Kii mountains are paths that will take you back 1 000 years. Linking a trio of grand shrines, the Kumano Kodō is a network of narrow


paths that have been walked by emperors, monks and Samurai warriors in search of spiritual cleansing for more than a millennium. In one of the most densely populated and


technologically advanced nations in the world, these quiet trails, which lead you up and down mountain passes and through forests of uniformly tall cedars and cypresses, provide a contemplative escape.


ALL ALONG THE WAY THERE ARE


PAPER LIGHTNING BOLTS STRUNG ON BRANCHES, MARKING THE PRESENCE OF SPIRITS LIVING WITHIN THE TREES, ROCKS AND WATERFALLS.


The spiritual grounding for the Kumano Kodō


lies in the fusion of two Japanese religions: Shinto and Buddhism. For thousands of years, the Kii mountains have been considered one of the most sacred places in the country and it’s here that the practices of Shinto and Buddhism found a union in the worship of nature. The original focus of the Kumano Kodō was


to worship at the three grand shrines to which the paths lead, but all along the way there are tiny stone shrines known as oji, as well as paper lightning bolts strung on branches and string to designate the presence of spirits living within the trees, rocks and waterfalls. While the big shrines themselves are


architecturally beautiful, it’s walking on the paths and seeing these simple markers of the connection between spirituality and nature that make the Kumano Kodō feel like a meditative pilgrimage, whether or not you know anything about either Shinto or Buddhism. Other reasons the Kumano Kodō is so special


are the simple pleasures that await you at the end of each hiking day. Every evening you finish your walk in a small, sleepy village, where you spend the night in a cosy, family-run guesthouse. Here you’ll sleep on a futon in a traditional tatami-mat room and feast on multi-course meals of delectable, home-cooked Japanese food. The cherry on the top is the night-time submersion in a natural hot bath – almost all the villages have indoor and outdoor ones – where you can soak your tired muscles in healing mineral water, just like all those emperors and Samurai who’ve come before you.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101