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TOYOTA CONNECT


Now they have plenty of money and felt they just had to have it.” In January, Mast auctioned a car


for Barrett-Jackson fl anked by chat show host Jay Leno and former President George W Bush on the block. The two men had signed the vehicle and it raised $1,4 million, with the money donated to the Military Service Initiative. It was technically worth about $250 000, Mast says, but it bore Vehicle Identifi cation Number 1, which made it unique. His advice for buying a classic car at an auction is to know what’s real and what’s not. “There are many fakes, with people building vehicles to look like old cars, but they’re not originals,” he warns. It’s important to seek advice from experts and read the auction notes carefully, he stresses. Reputable


auctioneers will put something in the description to say it’s not original, to protect their own reputation. “We obviously want repeat customers, so if we sell someone a car that we say is original and it’s not, next time they won’t be that confi dent buying from us.” Besides specialising in early 1950s


to late 1960s classics, Mast also sells newer super-cars. While he owns a couple of special models, he drives a pick-up truck most days. But he won’t arrive at an auction in a pick-up if it’s


Below: Top auctioneer Joseph Mast with Tim Mast, President of the National Auctioneers ‘ Association, and Joff van Reenen, Director of SA’s High Street Auction Company. Opposite, top: Former American


President George W Bush Jnr assisted Mast at a charity auction. Opposite, below: The Toyota 2000GT and Lexus LFA are considered serious collectables.


out of town. As a qualifi ed pilot – who earns commission on every item he auctions – he fl ies himself around in a private plane. Mast ventured into auctioneering


as a teenager. “I was a sixth-generation dairy farmer. My father sold the farm when I was 18 and I had no idea what I was going to do,” he recalls. “He brought home a fl ier for auction school one evening and said to me: ‘You’ve got a good voice. I think you’d be good at this.’” He does, indeed, have a good voice


– a solid, reassuring, dependable one, even if he rattles off during bidding at such high speed that you only catch one word in fi ve, or the fi gure that’s been bid and the incremental rise he’s seeking. It’s all part of the showmanship designed to generate


“PEOPLE’S DEFINITIONS OF ‘CLASSIC’ CAN BE WIDE-RANGING: SOME PEOPLE FALL IN LOVE WITH A CAR AND SUDDENLY THEY THINK IT’S CLASSIC.”


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