search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Knowledge@Wharton: In the book, you break this down into five areas. The first is cultivating the present. Could you talk about that?


Steidle: This is the first step of integrating mindfulness into the change process. It is understanding and building your own self-awareness. We do this by practicing different mindfulness activities. There are a lot of different places where you can learn mindfulness practices, but if you simply practice sitting and noticing, even if you just are watching and counting your own breaths, that is the start of stimulating the parts of your brain that are going to bring you the benefits.


As the first step, I use the question, “What is happening?” The more that we begin to notice how change and our current circumstances are affecting us, where stress originates, what we might need in that particular moment, what is our role in any particular circumstance and situation, then we begin to see that whatever we experience is usually something that is relatively impermanent. We can stop identifying with certain things, we can let our judgment go, and we can be more patient with whatever we’re experiencing in the moment, and less reactive.


Knowledge@Wharton: How do you think curiosity impacts mindfulness?


Steidle: I think curiosity is a critical component of mindfulness that allows us to look at what is unfolding. This includes scrutinizing and examining a business strategy or circumstance, or looking at whatever is creating anxiety for us in a moment. It allows us to open with that level of non- judgment so that we can explore what’s really underlying this at the root level.


Higher Residual Power 50%+


Higher Starting Power 20%+


30%+


* * *


Faster Recharge


500 | 501 | 525 | 525A | 525B | 525C | 550 | 551 | S550 | 560 | 560XL | 650 | 680 See Gillbatteries.com for more information


FAA-PMA for CITATION Upgrade to the Next Generation of Lead-Acid Technology!


✔TSO Authorized, DO-160E Tested ✔Sealed, VRLA, Non-Spillable ✔2 Year Warranty ✔18 Month/1800 Hour Capacity Check Inspection ✔FAA-PMA ✔EASA


*Based on comparison of competitor internet published numbers on 8/18/2017 for RG-380E/44 Series of batteries as compared to Gill 7638-44T model tested at Gill labs. | 909.793.3131 | GILLBATTERIES.COM 47 } 7638-44T


AVAILABLE NOW AT DISTRIBUTORS


Part of the effectiveness of a social


innovator is getting to the roots of an issue by inquiring. We inquire with that curiosity through a mindfulness practice, and also by looking at the innovation process. We try to understand the whole ecosystem of what is taking place. We ask why. We’re proactive in looking at our own role in maintaining the status quo. We look at our blind spots and our own biases. We look at where our reactivity is coming from. With all of that kind of curiosity,


we’re less likely to get attached to our own agenda and not hear the ideas of other people. We’ve all worked with people like that, who just can’t see beyond what they think. It makes us more willing to learn from what our relationships and experiences are teaching us. We come at our


relationships with more humility and greater levels of willingness to compromise and take accountability and responsibility for our stuff. That is going to make us willing to be more inclusive, more open to diverse ideas, and thus have greater potential for innovation because it’s being informed by a much more diverse collective of input.


Republished with permission from Knowledge@Wharton (http:// knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu), the online research and business analysis journal of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.


The Better Performing Sealed Lead-Acid Battery


INNOVATION


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68