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WORKPLACE COLLABORATION


CHARACTER


DO YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES CONTROL YOUR CHARACTER, OR DOES YOUR CHARACTER DETERMINE YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES?


The letter “C” as it relates to CHANGED can be linked to many words: constant (occurring all the time with no breaks or relief), compassionate (giving others the space and words they need to hear to adapt or accept change within their comfort zone), communication (neither drinking-the-Kool-Aid type nor presenting the change as all doom and gloom), concession (resignedly accepting the change as the only option available), critical (for progress and innovation) or even clueless (how to manage the change or how to successfully resolve it).


The change can be large or small (think back to the communications circle and how diff erent your team members might be) depending on other events in their lives. What might be a small change today can certainly be a major upheaval at another time.


26 DOMmagazine.com | mar 2018


The one element that is the foundation of leading, managing, resolving, resisting or implementing change is your character. As we saw last year, your character is comprised of a multitude of facets. Your character will dictate: a) How you communicate the upcoming change, specifi cally in the areas of detail/no detail (communication)


b) If others fully and completely believe what you say will occur will indeed occur (honesty and humility)


c) Noticing your reactions (including your attitude) and how that aff ects your team members (awareness)


d) How quickly you can reframe and bounce back to a more positive mindset and action-oriented stance (resiliency)


BY DR. SHARI FRISINGER


e) How genuine your thoughts, feelings and actions are perceived (authenticity)


f) Your ability to look at the big picture and convey the benefi ts to others (context)


g) How much trust others will have that you are looking out for them (trust and tact)


h) How you present that the decisions to make the changes were made ethically and will be what is best for the organization and/or fl ight department (ethics)


i) The respect you show others, especially when they are not on board or are fi ghting the change (respect)


Indeed, your reputation to upper management, to your colleagues, to your direct reports, to your customers and your clients is on the line.


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