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Quality Experience, Turntime


Since 1960, operators worldwide have trusted Consolidated Aircraft Supply for their accessory overhauls. Factory trained and authorized by K.G.S. Electronics. Wherever you are worldwide, no matter what aircraft you operate, our extensive spares inventory is ready to solve your AOG needs.


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FAA GI1R167K EASA 4346


Major credit cards accepted


631.981.7700 • Fax: 631.981.7706 • Toll Free USA: 800.422.6300 55 Raynor Ave, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 USA • consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com


of global expansion. Banning new certifications would restrain their growth without enhancing safety.


A ban on new foreign certifications would also have practical consequences for U.S. airlines. Because U.S.-registered aircraft and related components need to be maintained by a facility or person approved by the FAA, fewer foreign repair stations makes it harder for American carriers to operated internationally.


Then there’s the risk of retaliation. The U.S. maintenance sector has a positive balance of trade. (American businesses perform more work for foreign customers than U.S. air carriers send overseas). Banning new FAA-certificated repair stations could lead the European Union, China and others to restrict new certifications


and approvals in the U.S. (More than 1,400 U.S. facilities are approved by EASA to work on European- registered aircraft and related components.)


But the risk isn’t just to foreign repair stations and U.S. facilities serving international customers; at least one congressional staffer has hinted a ban could even extend to new domestic certifications as well. That would be a disaster for our growing, thriving industry and the hundreds of thousands of Americans working in it.


There’s a saying that those who don’t learn the lessons of history are doomed to repeat them. In the past, the aviation maintenance industry hasn’t stepped up as aggressively as it should when Congress has threated repair stations. The risks in the current


reauthorization only underscore the importance of ARSA’s advocacy and your engagement. Ultimately, whether we win or lose will be a function of our members’ willingness to get involved and support the association’s work.


Christian A. Klein is the managing member of Obadal, Filler, MacLeod & Klein, P.L.C overseeing the firm’s policy advocacy


practice. He represents trade associations as a registered federal lobbyist and provides strategic communications and legal counsel services to clients. He is executive vice president of the Aeronautical Repair Station Association and represents the American Concrete Pressure Pipe Association.


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