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Loss of the British influence in our


regulations was one of the results of a more integrated North American market. As Canada was once part of the British Empire, we had adopted the British system of regulation and titles, like air navigation orders. One other innovation was


reforming the AME licensing and training program in the late 1970s and 1980s. The addition of the Category E license was an innovation. Prior to that you needed up to three signatures to release avionics work, depending on whether there was any major work involved. The requirement for structured apprenticeships and college training was an innovation as was the founding of the Canadian Aviation Maintenance Council


(CAMC). It is hard to imagine that some 40 years ago there were few national trade standards for such trades as sheet metal, aircraft painters, etc. The industry was not totally without some guidance as they used military standards and some SAE standards. But thanks to a study by the Immigration and Employment Canada Department, assisted by Transport Canada, the idea of a council to develop national standards for all aviation trades was raised and CAMC was formed. In Canada, the provinces control education except for a few federal areas like marine and aviation. Through working with provinces unions, community colleges and aviation groups, CAMC solved this situation and today we have national standards for aviation trades.


CAMC today carries on this work as the Canadian Aviation and Aerospace Council (CAAC). The move from the direct product inspection and individual craftsman system of the first half of the 20th century into quality control, then quality assurance and finally into safety management systems (SMS) were all innovations. I have discussed this evolution in previous D.O.M. magazine articles that you can find online. There were many innovations in the flight operations field as well. You can look at the regulations pertaining to accident investigation and find many examples, such as requiring flight data recorders, and even the formation of independent accident investigation bodies. There


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