search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
THE HUMAN ERROR


RESILIENCE BY GORDON DUPONT


Resilience, or resilience engineering, is one of the means being studied in order to reduce human error. I recently had the opportunity to attend a lecture by a head surgeon on resilience and wondered just how this would apply to aviation maintenance. I sat with the head of the regional TSB/C and discussed how this would apply even to aviation. The following is some of what I learned and perhaps you can tell me if it can be adapted to enable us to lower maintenance human error. After all, we are all human.


Using engineering terminology,


resilience is simply the ability of a material to spring back to its original


26 DOMmagazine.com | july 2017


shape. For example, if you bounce a rubber ball, it deforms when it hits something but regains its shape as soon as the pressure is released in the bounce. Now, if we take the human, resilience is the capacity to recover quickly from a significant emotional event. Like materials, that varies greatly between humans. To some extent, for us humans, it could depend on the event as well. For example, some soldiers fighting side by side come home from a war and carry on as before, while others experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and their lives are never the same. By the way, the word resilience and resiliency are


completely interchangeable, although some academics might argue otherwise. Thus, in a vain attempt to keep everyone happy, I will use both. The resilience the doctor was talking about was the ability of a trauma team to function under sudden overwhelming conditions unlike any ever experienced before. For example, a 747 crashes at the airport with multiple injuries. They can’t say, “Take them somewhere else because we’re full.” They call on resiliency and do what needs to be done. They may have to think outside the box as they turn the restaurant into a triage center. They may have to turn a laundry into an


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68