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WORKPLACE COLLABORATION


eliminate the impossible, whatever remains — no matter how improbable — must be the truth.”


TO SUMMARIZE


The context which is our reality is colored by memories of our experiences and our interpretation of the current situation or event. Putting situations and events in context requires you combine your impulse control (delaying the temptation to leap before you look), empathy (awareness and understanding of how situations affect others), balcony view*, listening skills and analytical abilities to maintain objectivity and doing what is fair and best for your team overall and for your team members individually. Your character is dependent upon


every aspect discussed so far. They are all intertwined and comprise who you are. The ability to put the


actions of others into the proper context serves to complement and reinforce your communication, awareness, humility, and resiliency. It also strengthens your reputation, your credibility and your trustworthiness. Here’s a recap of CHARACTER: C – Communications; H – Honesty and Humility; A – Awareness; R – Resiliency; A – Authenticity; C – Context. Next month will feature T. Paul, R., & Elder, L. (January 01,


2007). Critical Thinking: The Art of Socratic Questioning. Journal of Developmental Education, 31, 1, 17. Stein, S. J., & Book, H. E. (2011). The EQ edge: Emotional intelligence and your success. Mississauga, Ont: Jossey-Bass. Want more information on this topic and a checklist to keep nearby? E-mail Dr. Shari with your request for this and additional information on this topic.


Dr. Shari Frisinger is a behavior analyst, works with aviation companies and flight departments to maintain


optimum mental health and target what affects safety, productivity and morale. Her human factors and consulting programs raise situational awareness of potentially disruptive or unsafe behaviors, and provides solutions for all to “play nice in the same company hangar” to mitigate safety hazards. Dr. Shari is an NBAA PDP provider, a member of Aviation Psychology Association, and teaches leadership at The University of Charleston and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She has presented behavioral safety programs to numerous flight departments and aviation companies. Connect with Dr. Shari on LinkedIn and Twitter, or e-mail her (Shari@CornerStoneStrategiesLLC) to sign up for her newsletter.


*BALCONY OR BASEMENT VIEW? Imagine you are on the balcony of a high-rise building. Pay special attention to the expansive view you have. You now have 360-degree vision and are looking at the big picture. Contrast that with the view you would have from the basement; a much narrower and limited view where you can see only what is in your immediate area. Leaders should (and usually do) operate from the balcony; your team members, especially the junior ones, could be operating from the basement view. Keep this in mind when you are communicating and assessing the situation.


Grand Junction, CO 877.744.9383 Chattanooga, TN 423.661.8900 East Alton, IL 800.922.2421


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