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Step four is to control the emotions. Anger and panic are unlikely to help the situation at this stage. Sometimes a repeated mantra (under your breath and in your mind, of course) like “we shall overcome” or “we can beat this” will help. You have to believe.


Step fi ve is to take some time for mindfulness. By that I mean time for yourself. Stress can wear you down. We all need some time to recharge your resilience batteries by getting away from the stress for a while. (Refer to D.O.M. magazine’s April 2017 issue for more help here.)


Step six is to always prepare for the unexpected, even if it is only mentally.


Organizations develop emergency response plans to


try to anticipate when resilience might be required. The medical fi eld has developed four stepping stones to assist resilience. They are LEARN, RESPOND, MONITOR, and ANTICIPATE. I might put them in a diff erent order, but this is part of resilience engineering which is helping make the medical fi eld a Safer place. Mental strength is much like physical strength. You need


to work on it in order for it to be there when you need it. None of us could run a marathon or ironman competition tomorrow without a lot of work preparing for it with exercise. The mental exercise calls for the positive thinking and being mentally prepared for whatever life or work throws at us. Believe in yourself. Resiliency resides in you and only


you can call upon that inner strength when you need it. Until the next issue, be Safe and be happy. Life is way too short to do otherwise.


Gordon Dupont worked as a special programs coordinator for Transport Canada from March 1993 to August 1999. Prior to working for Transport, Dupont worked for seven years as a technical investigator for the Canadian Aviation Safety Board (later


to become the Canadian Transportation Safety Board). He saw fi rsthand the tragic results of maintenance and human error. Dupont has been an aircraft maintenance engineer and commercial pilot in Canada, the United States and Australia. He is the past president and founding member of the Pacifi c Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Association. He is a founding member and a board member of the Maintenance and Ramp Safety Society (MARSS). Dupont, who is often called “The Father of the Dirty Dozen,” has provided human factors training around the world. He retired from Transport Canada in 1999 and is now a private consultant. He is interested in any work that will serve to make our industry safer. Visit www.system-safety.com for more information.


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S.E.A.L Aviation 1011 N.W. 51ST. Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 33309 www.SEALaviation.com | 954-492-3522 | Sales@SEALaviation.com


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